Difference between revisions of "Web Application Firewall"

From OWASP
Jump to: navigation, search
(Description: Adding clarifying info comparing with proxies and reverse proxies. Source: http://security.stackexchange.com/a/93847/5997)
(Clearing up clutter)
 
Line 1: Line 1:
 
=Description=
 
=Description=
A '''web application firewall (WAF)''' is an appliance, server plugin, or filter that applies a set of rules to an HTTP conversation. Generally, these rules cover common attacks such as [[Cross-site Scripting (XSS)|cross-site scripting (XSS)]] and [[SQL Injection|SQL injection]].
+
A '''web application firewall (WAF)''' is an [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Application_firewall application firewall] for HTTP applications. It applies a set of rules to an HTTP conversation. Generally, these rules cover common attacks such as [[Cross-site Scripting (XSS)|cross-site scripting (XSS)]] and [[SQL Injection|SQL injection]].
  
A WAF differs from a proxy in that proxies protect clients, while WAFs protect servers. A WAF is deployed to protect a specific web application or set of web applications. A WAF can be considered a [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reverse_proxy reverse proxy].
+
While proxies generally protect clients, WAFs protect servers. A WAF is deployed to protect a specific web application or set of web applications. A WAF can be considered a [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reverse_proxy reverse proxy].
  
WAFs may be customized to an application. The effort to perform this customization can be significant and needs to be maintained as the application is modified.
+
WAFs may come in the form of an appliance, server plugin, or filter, and may be customized to an application. The effort to perform this customization can be significant and needs to be maintained as the application is modified.
 
 
 
 
A far more detailed description is available at [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Application_firewall Wikipedia].
 
  
 
= OWASP Projects =
 
= OWASP Projects =
 
 
* The [https://www.owasp.org/index.php/Category:OWASP_ModSecurity_Core_Rule_Set_Project OWASP ModSecurity CRS Project's] goal is to provide an easily "pluggable" set of generic attack detection rules that provide a base level of protection for any web application.
 
* The [https://www.owasp.org/index.php/Category:OWASP_ModSecurity_Core_Rule_Set_Project OWASP ModSecurity CRS Project's] goal is to provide an easily "pluggable" set of generic attack detection rules that provide a base level of protection for any web application.
* Consider the [https://www.owasp.org/index.php/WASC_OWASP_Web_Application_Firewall_Evaluation_Criteria_Project Web Application Firewall Evaluation Criteria Project (WAFEC)] to help evaluate commercial and open source web application firewalls.  
+
* Consider the [https://www.owasp.org/index.php/WASC_OWASP_Web_Application_Firewall_Evaluation_Criteria_Project Web Application Firewall Evaluation Criteria Project (WAFEC)] to help evaluate commercial and open source web application firewalls.
 +
 +
= References  =
 +
* https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Web_application_firewall
  
 
[[Category: OWASP WAF]]
 
[[Category: OWASP WAF]]
 
= References  =
 
*https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Application_firewall
 

Latest revision as of 17:33, 18 October 2016

Description

A web application firewall (WAF) is an application firewall for HTTP applications. It applies a set of rules to an HTTP conversation. Generally, these rules cover common attacks such as cross-site scripting (XSS) and SQL injection.

While proxies generally protect clients, WAFs protect servers. A WAF is deployed to protect a specific web application or set of web applications. A WAF can be considered a reverse proxy.

WAFs may come in the form of an appliance, server plugin, or filter, and may be customized to an application. The effort to perform this customization can be significant and needs to be maintained as the application is modified.

OWASP Projects

References