Difference between revisions of "OWASP Game Security Framework Project"

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==OWASP Game Security Framework (GSF)==
 
==OWASP Game Security Framework (GSF)==
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The OWASP Game Security Framework is free to use. It is licensed under the http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 license], so you can copy, distribute and transmit the work, and you can adapt it, and use it commercially, but all provided that you attribute the work and if you alter, transform, or build upon this work, you may distribute the resulting work only under the same or similar license to this one.
 
The OWASP Game Security Framework is free to use. It is licensed under the http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 license], so you can copy, distribute and transmit the work, and you can adapt it, and use it commercially, but all provided that you attribute the work and if you alter, transform, or build upon this work, you may distribute the resulting work only under the same or similar license to this one.
  
== ==
 
 
{{Social Media Links}}
 
{{Social Media Links}}
  
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== What is the OWASP Game Security Framework? ==
 
== What is the OWASP Game Security Framework? ==
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== Contributors ==
 
== Contributors ==
* LFG
+
* Kevin Hemmingsen
 +
* Troy Cunefare
 +
* Ryan Lawrence
 +
* Martin Mendoza
 +
* Koray Algan
  
 
== Related Projects ==
 
== Related Projects ==
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* [[OWASP_Mobile_Security_Project|OWASP Mobile Security]]
 
* [[OWASP_Mobile_Security_Project|OWASP Mobile Security]]
  
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== Collaboration ==
 
== Collaboration ==
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== Game Security Attack Surfaces ==
 
== Game Security Attack Surfaces ==
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The following is a list of the attack surfaces that can be found in video games of various types.
 
The following is a list of the attack surfaces that can be found in video games of various types.
  
 
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{| class="wikitable" border="1" style="text-align: left"
{| border="1" class="wikitable" style="text-align: left"
 
 
! Attack Surface
 
! Attack Surface
 
! Description
 
! Description
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|}
 
|}
  
== ==
 
 
{{Social Media Links}}
 
{{Social Media Links}}
  
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== What is the Attack Surfaces Section? ==
 
== What is the Attack Surfaces Section? ==
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== Game Security Vulnerabilities ==
 
== Game Security Vulnerabilities ==
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The following is a list of the vulnerabilities that can be found in video games of various types, and the attack surfaces they're likely to be associated with.
 
The following is a list of the vulnerabilities that can be found in video games of various types, and the attack surfaces they're likely to be associated with.
  
{| border="1" class="wikitable" style="text-align: left"
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{| class="wikitable" border="1" style="text-align: left"
 
! Attack Surface
 
! Attack Surface
 
! Vulnerability Name
 
! Vulnerability Name
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|}
 
|}
  
== ==
 
 
{{Social Media Links}}
 
{{Social Media Links}}
  
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== What is the Game Security Vulnerabilities Project? ==
 
== What is the Game Security Vulnerabilities Project? ==
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== Game Security Vulnerabilities ==
 
== Game Security Vulnerabilities ==
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The following is a list of the vulnerabilities that can be found in video games of various types, and the attack surfaces they're likely to be associated with.
 
The following is a list of the vulnerabilities that can be found in video games of various types, and the attack surfaces they're likely to be associated with.
  
{| border="1" class="wikitable" style="text-align: left"
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! Attack Surface
 
! Attack Surface
 
! Description
 
! Description
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|}
  
== ==
 
 
{{Social Media Links}}
 
{{Social Media Links}}
  
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== What is the Game Security Vulnerabilities Project? ==
 
== What is the Game Security Vulnerabilities Project? ==
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== Game Security Vulnerabilities ==
 
== Game Security Vulnerabilities ==
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The following is a list of the vulnerabilities that can be found in video games of various types, and the attack surfaces they're likely to be associated with.
 
The following is a list of the vulnerabilities that can be found in video games of various types, and the attack surfaces they're likely to be associated with.
  
{| border="1" class="wikitable" style="text-align: left"
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! Attack Surface
 
! Attack Surface
 
! Description
 
! Description
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|}
  
== ==
 
 
{{Social Media Links}}
 
{{Social Media Links}}
  
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== What is the Game Security Vulnerabilities Project? ==
 
== What is the Game Security Vulnerabilities Project? ==
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== Common Game Security Defenses ==
 
== Common Game Security Defenses ==
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== ==
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{{Social Media Links}}
 
{{Social Media Links}}
  
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== What is the Game Security Vulnerabilities Project? ==
 
== What is the Game Security Vulnerabilities Project? ==
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: "The attacker attacked and edited the <code>LOCAL GAME CLIENT (Attack Surface)</code>,  which had a <code>LACK OF CLIENT INTEGRITY CONTROLS (Vulnerability)</code>, which allowed her to <code>ARTIFICIALLY INCREASE HER ABILITIES (Attacker Goal)</code>, ultimately leading to an <code>UNHAPPY PLAYER BASE (Negative Outcome)</code> and <code>DECLINING GAME REVENUE (Negative Outcome)</code> due to cheating.”
 
: "The attacker attacked and edited the <code>LOCAL GAME CLIENT (Attack Surface)</code>,  which had a <code>LACK OF CLIENT INTEGRITY CONTROLS (Vulnerability)</code>, which allowed her to <code>ARTIFICIALLY INCREASE HER ABILITIES (Attacker Goal)</code>, ultimately leading to an <code>UNHAPPY PLAYER BASE (Negative Outcome)</code> and <code>DECLINING GAME REVENUE (Negative Outcome)</code> due to cheating.”
  
== ==
 
 
{{Social Media Links}}
 
{{Social Media Links}}
  
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* Home Electronics
 
* Home Electronics
 
* Public Infrastructure
 
* Public Infrastructure
== ==
+
 
 
[http://builditsecure.ly BuildItSecure.ly]
 
[http://builditsecure.ly BuildItSecure.ly]
  
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* Curate informational resources
 
* Curate informational resources
 
* Present research
 
* Present research
== ==
+
 
 
[https://otalliance.org Online Trust Alliance]
 
[https://otalliance.org Online Trust Alliance]
  
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Addressing the mounting concerns, in January 2015 the Online Trust Alliance, established the [https://otalliance.org/initiatives/internet-things IoT Trustworthy Working Group (ITWG)], a multi-stakeholder initiative.  The group recognizes “security and privacy by design” must be a priority from the onset of product development and be addressed holistically. The framework focuses on privacy, security sustainability. The sustainability pillar is critical as it looks at the life-cycle issues related to long- term supportability and transfers of ownership of devices and the data collected.
 
Addressing the mounting concerns, in January 2015 the Online Trust Alliance, established the [https://otalliance.org/initiatives/internet-things IoT Trustworthy Working Group (ITWG)], a multi-stakeholder initiative.  The group recognizes “security and privacy by design” must be a priority from the onset of product development and be addressed holistically. The framework focuses on privacy, security sustainability. The sustainability pillar is critical as it looks at the life-cycle issues related to long- term supportability and transfers of ownership of devices and the data collected.
== ==
+
 
 
[https://allseenalliance.org/framework AllSeen Alliance]
 
[https://allseenalliance.org/framework AllSeen Alliance]
  
 
The AllSeen Alliance is a Linux Foundation collaborative project.  They're a cross-industry consortium dedicated to enabling the interoperability of billions of devices, services and apps that comprise the Internet of Things.  The Alliance supports the AllJoyn Framework, an open source software framework that makes it easy for devices and apps to discover and communicate with each other. Developers can write applications for interoperability regardless of transport layer, manufacturer, and without the need for Internet access. The software has been and will continue to be openly available for developers to download, and runs on popular platforms such as Linux and Linux-based Android, iOS, and Windows, including many other lightweight real-time operating systems.
 
The AllSeen Alliance is a Linux Foundation collaborative project.  They're a cross-industry consortium dedicated to enabling the interoperability of billions of devices, services and apps that comprise the Internet of Things.  The Alliance supports the AllJoyn Framework, an open source software framework that makes it easy for devices and apps to discover and communicate with each other. Developers can write applications for interoperability regardless of transport layer, manufacturer, and without the need for Internet access. The software has been and will continue to be openly available for developers to download, and runs on popular platforms such as Linux and Linux-based Android, iOS, and Windows, including many other lightweight real-time operating systems.
== ==
+
 
 
[http://www.iiconsortium.org/ The Industrial Internet Consortium (IIC)]
 
[http://www.iiconsortium.org/ The Industrial Internet Consortium (IIC)]
  
 
The Industrial Internet Consortium is the open membership, international not-for-profit consortium that is setting the architectural framework and direction for the Industrial Internet. Founded by AT&T, Cisco, GE, IBM and Intel in March 2014, the consortium’s mission is to coordinate vast ecosystem initiatives to connect and integrate objects with people, processes and data using common architectures, interoperability and open standards.
 
The Industrial Internet Consortium is the open membership, international not-for-profit consortium that is setting the architectural framework and direction for the Industrial Internet. Founded by AT&T, Cisco, GE, IBM and Intel in March 2014, the consortium’s mission is to coordinate vast ecosystem initiatives to connect and integrate objects with people, processes and data using common architectures, interoperability and open standards.
== ==
+
 
 
[http://securingsmartcities.org/ Securing Smart Cities]
 
[http://securingsmartcities.org/ Securing Smart Cities]
  
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== Commonly Used Game Hacking Tools ==
 
== Commonly Used Game Hacking Tools ==
  
== ==
 
 
{{Social Media Links}}
 
{{Social Media Links}}
  
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[[Category:OWASP_Release_Quality_Document]]

Revision as of 23:49, 20 March 2017

OWASP Project Header.jpg

OWASP Game Security Framework (GSF)

The OWASP Game Security Framework (GSF) represents a modular approach to understanding the security issues that surround video game ecosystems.

In 2016 the videogame market became 99.6 Billion dollar industry... any why shouldn't it be? Some of the most prolific and complex software developed today are video games. They are professionally played, sponsored, scrutinized, monetized, and celebrated, just like many sports. They handle clients, servers, web components, monetary transfers, social interactions, virtual markets, etc, with every bit the need of security that most internet hosted apps have (if not more in some cases). The GSF is designed to help threat model gaming issues that have devastated new games. Most importantly we hope the GSF can help new developers and security testers alike root out bugs in your favorite titles.

The framework is broken into three main concepts / sections:


1. Identifying and clustering the components of risk within the overall game security space, and then giving instances of each component.


Components include the following:


  • Attack Surfaces: the various surface areas that can be attacked by attackers in order to cause harm to the gaming ecosystem.
  • Vulnerabilities: the specific weaknesses in design or implementation that allows attackers to successfully target a given game.
  • Attacker Goals: a list of the reasons that an attacker might want to attack a given game.
  • Negative Outcomes: a collection of ways that the gaming company could ultimately be impacted negatively by attacks to its game and associated infrastructure.


2. A natural language semantic structure for thinking about and articulating game security issues, which uses the modular risk components as sentence structure.


Example:


"The attacker attacked and edited the LOCAL GAME CLIENT (Attack Surface), which had a LACK OF CLIENT INTEGRITY CONTROLS (Vulnerability), which allowed her to ARTIFICIALLY INCREASE HER ABILITIES (Attacker Goal), ultimately leading to an UNHAPPY PLAYER BASE (Negative Outcome) and DECLINING GAME REVENUE (Negative Outcome) due to cheating.”


Using this structure, security testers can clearly communicate the various aspects of a game security issue to many different types of stakeholder—from pentesting peers to business executives in the gaming industry.


3. Examples of real-world examples of previous attacks against games, and how the attacks map to the GSF framework components.

Licensing

The OWASP Game Security Framework is free to use. It is licensed under the http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 license], so you can copy, distribute and transmit the work, and you can adapt it, and use it commercially, but all provided that you attribute the work and if you alter, transform, or build upon this work, you may distribute the resulting work only under the same or similar license to this one.


What is the OWASP Game Security Framework?

The goal of the OWASP Game Security Framework is to provide a structure for discussing the various aspects around the security of video games.

The target audience for the project includes:

  • Gamers
  • QA
  • Game designers
  • Penetration testers
  • Gaming executives
  • Anyone else with a vested interest in game security

Project Leaders

  • Jason Haddix
  • Daniel Miessler

Contributors

  • Kevin Hemmingsen
  • Troy Cunefare
  • Ryan Lawrence
  • Martin Mendoza
  • Koray Algan

Related Projects

Collaboration

The Slack Channel

Quick Download

COMING SOON

News and Events

  • [JANUARY 2017] Doing a complete redesign of the project.

Classifications

Owasp-incubator-trans-85.png Owasp-builders-small.png
Owasp-defenders-small.png
Cc-button-y-sa-small.png
Project Type Files DOC.jpg
OWASP Project Header.jpg

Game Security Attack Surfaces

The following is a list of the attack surfaces that can be found in video games of various types.

Attack Surface Description
Local Game Client
  • The locally running game client that is accessible to the gamer because it's running on his/her machine.
Game Network Traffic
  • The network which game traffic traverses in order to reach the game's server or peers who are playing the game.
Game Server
  • The game server that is hosting the instance that gamers connect to in order to play the game.
Game Economy
  • The economic system that exists within the game.


What is the Attack Surfaces Section?

This section provides an overview of the various places an attacker can target to harm a given game infrastructure.

Project Leaders

  • Daniel Miessler

Related Projects

Collaboration

The Slack Channel

Quick Download

  • Coming Soon

News and Events

  • Coming Soon
OWASP Project Header.jpg

Game Security Vulnerabilities

The following is a list of the vulnerabilities that can be found in video games of various types, and the attack surfaces they're likely to be associated with.

Attack Surface Vulnerability Name
Local Game Client
  • Ability to edit in-game resources
  • Ability to bypass license requirement
Game Network Traffic
  • Network Denial of Service (player)
    • Player bandwidth exhaustion
    • Player game client resource exhaustion
Game Application Traffic
  • Application Level Denial of Service (Player)
    • Player application logic Denial of Service
Game Server
  • Application Level Denial of Service (Server)
    • Server application logic Denial of Service
  • Ability to modify game ladder rankings
  • Ability to modify own player resources
Game Economy
  • Ability to generate unlimited money on client side
  • Ability to generate unlimited money through network/application traffic modification
  • Ability to modify prices for in-game items
  • Ability to replay financial actions such as buying or selling through network/application manipulation


What is the Game Security Vulnerabilities Project?

The Security Vulnerabilities Project provides information on what types of vulnerabilities exist within games, and which attack surfaces they fall under.

Project Leaders

  • Jason Haddix

Related Projects

Collaboration

The Slack Channel

Resources

News and Events

  • Coming Soon
OWASP Project Header.jpg

Game Security Vulnerabilities

The following is a list of the vulnerabilities that can be found in video games of various types, and the attack surfaces they're likely to be associated with.

Attack Surface Description
Local Game Client
  • Ability to edit in-game resources
  • Ability to bypass license requirement
Game Network Traffic
  • Network Denial of Service (player)
    • Player bandwidth exhaustion
    • Player game client resource exhaustion
Game Application Traffic
  • Application Level Denial of Service (Player)
    • Player application logic Denial of Service
Game Server
  • Application Level Denial of Service (Server)
    • Server application logic Denial of Service
  • Ability to modify game ladder rankings
  • Ability to modify own player resources
Game Economy
  • Ability to generate unlimited money on client side
  • Ability to generate unlimited money through network/application traffic modification
  • Ability to modify prices for in-game items
  • Ability to replay financial actions such as buying or selling through network/application manipulation


What is the Game Security Vulnerabilities Project?

The Security Vulnerabilities Project provides information on what types of vulnerabilities exist within games, and which attack surfaces they fall under.

Project Leaders

  • Daniel Miessler

Related Projects

Collaboration

The Slack Channel

Resources

News and Events

  • Coming Soon
OWASP Project Header.jpg

Game Security Vulnerabilities

The following is a list of the vulnerabilities that can be found in video games of various types, and the attack surfaces they're likely to be associated with.

Attack Surface Description
Local Game Client
  • Ability to edit in-game resources
  • Ability to bypass license requirement
Game Network Traffic
  • Network Denial of Service (player)
    • Player bandwidth exhaustion
    • Player game client resource exhaustion
Game Application Traffic
  • Application Level Denial of Service (Player)
    • Player application logic Denial of Service
Game Server
  • Application Level Denial of Service (Server)
    • Server application logic Denial of Service
  • Ability to modify game ladder rankings
  • Ability to modify own player resources
Game Economy
  • Ability to generate unlimited money on client side
  • Ability to generate unlimited money through network/application traffic modification
  • Ability to modify prices for in-game items
  • Ability to replay financial actions such as buying or selling through network/application manipulation


What is the Game Security Vulnerabilities Project?

The Security Vulnerabilities Project provides information on what types of vulnerabilities exist within games, and which attack surfaces they fall under.

Project Leaders

  • Daniel Miessler

Related Projects

Collaboration

The Slack Channel

Resources

News and Events

  • Coming Soon
OWASP Project Header.jpg

Common Game Security Defenses

Table Here



What is the Game Security Vulnerabilities Project?

The Security Vulnerabilities Project provides information on what types of vulnerabilities exist within games, and which attack surfaces they fall under.

Project Leaders

  • Daniel Miessler

Related Projects

Collaboration

The Slack Channel

Resources

News and Events

  • Coming Soon

Real-world Examples of Gaming Vulnerabilities

Vulnerability 1

Vulnerabilty Name Description Surface Area Attacker Goal Negative Outcome Tester Tool Defense Ref Genre
Local Resource Modification, Client-side Logic Flaw In 2015 The Division experienced an exploit that allowed an attacker to switch weapons rapidly, applying weapon buffs in a stacking manner, with no cap. Game Client Unfair Player Advantage Player Anger, Lost Revenue Game Client Cryptographic Integrity Checks on Game Client http://www.gamesradar.com/theres-a-division-damage-stacking-glitch-if-youve-got-fast-fingers/ 3PS/1PS/MMO
The attacker attacked and edited the LOCAL GAME CLIENT (Attack Surface), which had a LACK OF CLIENT INTEGRITY CONTROLS (Vulnerability), which allowed her to ARTIFICIALLY INCREASE HER ABILITIES (Attacker Goal), ultimately leading to an UNHAPPY PLAYER BASE (Negative Outcome) and DECLINING GAME REVENUE (Negative Outcome) due to cheating.

Template 1

"The attacker attacked and edited the LOCAL GAME CLIENT (Attack Surface), which had a LACK OF CLIENT INTEGRITY CONTROLS (Vulnerability), which allowed her to ARTIFICIALLY INCREASE HER ABILITIES (Attacker Goal), ultimately leading to an UNHAPPY PLAYER BASE (Negative Outcome) and DECLINING GAME REVENUE (Negative Outcome) due to cheating.”



I Am The Cavalry

A global grassroots organization that is focused on issues where computer security intersects public safety and human life.

Their areas of focus include:

  • Medical devices
  • Automobiles
  • Home Electronics
  • Public Infrastructure

BuildItSecure.ly

A project focused on helping small business connect with security researchers to aid in securing their IoT-based products before going market.

Their goals include:

  • Focus effort towards small business
  • Build partnerships
  • Coordinate efforts
  • Curate informational resources
  • Present research

Online Trust Alliance

Formed as an informal industry working group in 2005, today OTA is an Internal Revenue Service (IRS) approved 501c3 charitable organization with the mission to enhance online trust and empower users, while promoting innovation and the vitality of the internet. OTA is global organization supported by over 100 organizations headquartered in Bellevue, Washington with offices in Washington DC.

Addressing the mounting concerns, in January 2015 the Online Trust Alliance, established the IoT Trustworthy Working Group (ITWG), a multi-stakeholder initiative. The group recognizes “security and privacy by design” must be a priority from the onset of product development and be addressed holistically. The framework focuses on privacy, security sustainability. The sustainability pillar is critical as it looks at the life-cycle issues related to long- term supportability and transfers of ownership of devices and the data collected.

AllSeen Alliance

The AllSeen Alliance is a Linux Foundation collaborative project. They're a cross-industry consortium dedicated to enabling the interoperability of billions of devices, services and apps that comprise the Internet of Things. The Alliance supports the AllJoyn Framework, an open source software framework that makes it easy for devices and apps to discover and communicate with each other. Developers can write applications for interoperability regardless of transport layer, manufacturer, and without the need for Internet access. The software has been and will continue to be openly available for developers to download, and runs on popular platforms such as Linux and Linux-based Android, iOS, and Windows, including many other lightweight real-time operating systems.

The Industrial Internet Consortium (IIC)

The Industrial Internet Consortium is the open membership, international not-for-profit consortium that is setting the architectural framework and direction for the Industrial Internet. Founded by AT&T, Cisco, GE, IBM and Intel in March 2014, the consortium’s mission is to coordinate vast ecosystem initiatives to connect and integrate objects with people, processes and data using common architectures, interoperability and open standards.

Securing Smart Cities

Securing Smart Cities is a not-for-profit global initiative that aims to solve the existing and future cybersecurity problems of smart cities through collaboration between companies, governments, media outlets, other not-for-profit initiatives and individuals across the world.

Talks

RSA Conference San Francisco
Securing the Internet of Things: Mapping IoT Attack Surface Areas with the OWASP IoT Top 10 Project
Daniel Miessler, Practice Principal
April 21, 2015
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Defcon 23
IoT Attack Surface Mapping
Daniel Miessler
August 6-9, 2015

Podcasts

IoT Conferences

Conference Call for Papers

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Commonly Used Game Hacking Tools



PROJECT INFO
What does this OWASP project offer you?
RELEASE(S) INFO
What releases are available for this project?
what is this project?
Name: OWASP Internet of Things Project
Purpose: N/A
License: CC-BY 3.0 for documentation and GPLv3 for code.
who is working on this project?
Project Leader(s):
  • Daniel Miessler
  • Craig Smith
Project Contributor(s):
how can you learn more?
Project Pamphlet: Not Yet Created
Project Presentation:
Mailing list: N/A
Project Roadmap: Not Yet Created
Key Contacts
  • Contact Daniel Miessler to contribute to this project
  • Contact Daniel Miessler to review or sponsor this project
current release
Not Yet Published
last reviewed release
Not Yet Reviewed


other releases