AppSecAsiaPac2012

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Welcome to the OWASP 2012 Appsec Asia Pacific Conference.

The event is being held in Sydney, Australia from the 11th to the 14th of April 2012 at the Four Points Sheraton Darling Harbour.

The conference consists of 2 days of world class training by OWASP instructor's followed by 2 days of quality presentations and keynotes from industry leaders, OWASP projects and industry consultants. In previous years the OWASP Asia Pacific conference has been rated as one of the "must attend" events of the year, with the conference always filling up quickly.


Who should attend this conference:

  • Application Developers, Testers, Quality Assurance Team Members
  • Chief Information Officers, Security Officers, Technology Officers
  • Security Managers and Staff
  • Executives, Managers and staff responsible for IT Security Governance
  • IT Professionals interested in Improving Information Security


Conference Highlights:

  • Alastair MacGibbon: Keynote Presentation (more information available on "Speakers" Tab)
  • Jacob West (Fortify - HP): Keynote Presentation (more information available on "Speakers" Tab)
  • Industry Leading training - Exploiting Web Applications with Samurai-WTF
  • Industry Panel from Finance and Insurance Sectors
  • Networking Opportunities to meet peers and other developers
  • Gain access to resources within OWASP projects as well as leading vendors


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Thank you to all of our supporters!


Diamond & Platinum Sponsors

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Gold & Silver Sponsors


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Associations & Supporters

We are proudly supported by the following Industry Associations and Media outlets.

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OWASP AppSec Asia Pacific features two days of training April 11-12, and two days of talks, April 13-14


Please note - all prices below appear in USD; however the exchange rate at the current time is nearly 1:1 with AUD.


Conference Registration Fees (not including training)

Ticket Type
Early (until March 1) Regular Price
Non-Member $495 USD $545 USD
Non-Member plus 1-year OWASP Membership! $495 USD $545 USD
Active OWASP Member $445 USD $495 USD
Student $75 USD $100 USD
Training Only (See pricing table below)


Training Fees

Course Length
Price
1-Day Class $695 USD
2-Day Class $1295 USD

Price per attendee. Please note that conference Registration is separate.

For more information on available training courses and trainer bios, please select the "Trainers and Training Schedule" tab.


Group Discounts

10% off for groups of 10-19 20% off for groups of 20-29 30% off for groups of 30 or more

Please Contact Us for more information about registering a group.


Membership Discounts

We are pleased to offer $50 off admission for active OWASP members, AISA members, and AUSCERT members. Multiple discounts can not be applied.

  • OWASP Members - please select the "Member" registration option to receive your discount. You will need to register using the email address used at the time of enrolling for membership. If you need help remembering this email address, Contact Us.
  • AISA Members - please select one of the "Non-Member" registration options (Non-Member or Non-Member plus one year OWASP membership), and enter discount code: AISA50 in the text box. Proof of membership (i.e. membership number) will be required at the time of registering.
  • AUSCERT Members - please select one of the "Non-Member" registration options (Non-Member or Non-Member plus one year OWASP membership), and enter discount code: AUSCERT50 in the text box. Proof of membership (i.e. membership number) will be required at the time of registering.


Registration for Trainers and Speakers

If you have been selected to deliver a training or talk at the conference, you should have received a discount code for complimentary admission.
If you did not receive this code or have questions, please Contact Us.


Registration for OWASP Leaders

Complimentary admission to the conference is offered to active OWASP Chapter and Project Leaders. Additionally, two seats for each of the training courses are available at no cost to active OWASP Chapter and Project Leaders (available on a first come, first serve basis). To register as an active Chapter or Project leader, please select the "Member" registration option and enter discount code: OWASPLEADER. This is also the discount code that should be used to register for the training course.


Please note: conference and training registration using the OWASPLEADER discount code will be verified by the conference team and if you are not an active OWASP Chapter or Project Leader, you will be contacted regarding your status and your registration may be subject to cancellation.


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The OWASP 2012 Appsec Asia Pacific Conference has been able to secure world class training sessions for all levels of expertise. Questions? Email appsecasia2012@owasp.org

Course descriptions and Trainer Bios are listed below the schedule


Training Schedule

Training Day 1 - Wednesday - April 11th


 (Time Allocated)  Training Room (1) - 2 Day Course
 (Grand Ballroom 1 - Ground Floor)
 Training Room (2) - 2 Day Courses
 (Grand Ballroom 2 - Ground Floor)
 Training Room (3) - 2 Day Courses
 (Grand Ballroom 3 - Ground Floor)
 Training Room (4) - 1 Day Courses
 (Wharf Room - Level 1)
 Training Room (5) - 1 Day Courses
 (Bridge Room - Level 1)
 7:30 - 9:00 AM


Conference Registration Open - Coffee & Tea Available
 9:00-10:30 AM
 Assessing & Exploiting Web Applications with Samurai-WTF

 Trainer: Justin Searle
 Training Syllabus: Course Abstract

 Hack Your Own Code: Advanced Training for Developers

 Trainer: Mike Park & Marc Bown
 Training Syllabus: Course Outline

 Mobile Penetration Testing: Start to Finish for iOS Applications

 Trainer: Jason Haddix
 Training Syllabus:

 Building Secure Web Applications

 Trainer: Klaus Johannes Rusch
 Training Syllabus: Course Outline

CANCELLED
 Threat Modeling: from the "cloud" on down

 Trainer: Matt Tesauro
 Training Syllabus:

 10:30-11:00 AM


Break - Morning Tea Coffee & Food to be provided to training.
 11:00-1:00 PM
 Assessing & Exploiting Web Applications with Samurai-WTF

 Trainer: Justin Searle
 Training Syllabus: Course Abstract

 Hack Your Own Code: Advanced Training for Developers

 Trainer: Mike Park & Marc Bown
 Training Syllabus: Course Outline

 Mobile Penetration Testing: Start to Finish for iOS Applications

 Trainer: Jason Haddix
 Training Syllabus:

 Building Secure Web Applications

 Trainer: Klaus Johannes Rusch
 Training Syllabus: Course Outline

CANCELLED
 Threat Modeling: from the "cloud" on down

 Trainer: Matt Tesauro
 Training Syllabus:

 1:00-1:30 PM


Break - Lunch - Provided for attendees in main Expo & Conference Hall - Ground Level
 1:30-3:00 PM
 Assessing & Exploiting Web Applications with Samurai-WTF

 Trainer: Justin Searle
 Training Syllabus: Course Abstract

 Hack Your Own Code: Advanced Training for Developers

 Trainer: Mike Park & Marc Bown
 Training Syllabus: Course Outline

 Mobile Penetration Testing: Start to Finish for iOS Applications

 Trainer: Jason Haddix
 Training Syllabus:

 Building Secure Web Applications

 Trainer: Klaus Johannes Rusch
 Training Syllabus: Course Outline

CANCELLED
 Threat Modeling: from the "cloud" on down

 Trainer: Matt Tesauro
 Training Syllabus:

 3:00-3:30 PM


Break - Afternoon Tea - Coffee & Food to be provided to training
 3:30-5:00 PM


 Assessing & Exploiting Web Applications with Samurai-WTF

 Trainer: Justin Searle
 Training Syllabus: Course Abstract

 Hack Your Own Code: Advanced Training for Developers

 Trainer: Mike Park & Marc Bown
 Training Syllabus: Course Outline

 Mobile Penetration Testing: Start to Finish for iOS Applications

 Trainer: Jason Haddix
 Training Syllabus:

 Building Secure Web Applications

 Trainer: Klaus Johannes Rusch
 Training Syllabus: Course Outline

CANCELLED
 Threat Modeling: from the "cloud" on down

 Trainer: Matt Tesauro
 Training Syllabus:


Training Day 2 - Thursday- April 12th


 (Time Allocated)  Training Room (1) - 2 Day Course
 (Grand Ballroom 1 - Ground Floor)
 Training Room (2) - 2 Day Courses
 (Grand Ballroom 2 - Ground Floor)
 Training Room (3) - 2 Day Courses
 (Grand Ballroom 3 - Ground Floor)
 Training Room (4) - 1 Day Courses
 (Wharf Room - Level 1)
 Training Room (5) - 1 Day Courses
 (Bridge Room - Level 1)
 Chapter Workshop (6)
 (Bridge Room 2 - Level 1)
 7:30 - 9:00 AM


Conference Registration Open - Coffee & Tea Available
 9:00-10:30 AM
 Assessing & Exploiting Web Applications with Samurai-WTF

 Trainer: Justin Searle
 Training Syllabus: Course Abstract

 Hack Your Own Code: Advanced Training for Developers

 Trainer: Mike Park & Marc Bown
 Training Syllabus: Course Outline

 Mobile Penetration Testing: Start to Finish for iOS Applications

 Trainer: Jason Haddix
 Training Syllabus:

 Mobile Applications & Security

 Trainer: Prashant Verma & Dinesh Shetty
 Training Syllabus:

 OWASP for CISO and Senior Managers (Business)

 Trainer: Tobias Gondrom
 Training Syllabus:

 Workshop starts at 1:30
Workshop Details
 10:30-11:00 AM


Break - Morning Tea Coffee & Food to be provided to training.
 11:00-1:00 PM
 Assessing & Exploiting Web Applications with Samurai-WTF

 Trainer: Justin Searle
 Training Syllabus: Course Abstract

 Hack Your Own Code: Advanced Training for Developers

 Trainer: Mike Park & Marc Bown
 Training Syllabus: Course Outline

 Mobile Penetration Testing: Start to Finish for iOS Applications

 Trainer: Jason Haddix
 Training Syllabus:

 Mobile Applications & Security

 Trainer: Prashant Verma & Dinesh Shetty
 Training Syllabus:

 OWASP for CISO and Senior Managers (Business)

 Trainer: Tobias Gondrom
 Training Syllabus:

 Workshop starts at 1:30
Workshop Details
 1:00-1:30 PM


Break - Lunch - Provided for attendees in main Expo & Conference Hall - Ground Level
 1:30-3:00 PM
 Assessing & Exploiting Web Applications with Samurai-WTF

 Trainer: Justin Searle
 Training Syllabus: Course Abstract

 Hack Your Own Code: Advanced Training for Developers

 Trainer: Mike Park & Marc Bown
 Training Syllabus: Course Outline

 Mobile Penetration Testing: Start to Finish for iOS Applications

 Trainer: Jason Haddix
 Training Syllabus:

 Mobile Applications & Security

 Trainer: Prashant Verma & Dinesh Shetty
 Training Syllabus:

 OWASP for CISO and Senior Managers (Business)

 Trainer: Tobias Gondrom
 Training Syllabus:

 OWASP Chapter Workshop


Workshop Details

 3:00-3:30 PM


Break - Afternoon Tea - Coffee & Food to be provided to training
 3:30-5:00 PM


 Assessing & Exploiting Web Applications with Samurai-WTF

 Trainer: Justin Searle
 Training Syllabus: Course Abstract

 Hack Your Own Code: Advanced Training for Developers

 Trainer: Mike Park & Marc Bown
 Training Syllabus: Course Outline

 Mobile Penetration Testing: Start to Finish for iOS Applications

 Trainer: Jason Haddix
 Training Syllabus:

 Mobile Applications & Security

 Trainer: Prashant Verma & Dinesh Shetty
 Training Syllabus:

 OWASP for CISO and Senior Managers (Business)

 Trainer: Tobias Gondrom
 Training Syllabus:

 OWASP Chapter Workshop


Workshop Details


Two Day Training Courses

Assessing & Exploiting Web Applications with Samurai-WTF

Trainer: Justin Searle
Audience & Level: Novice to intermediate level security professionals: developers, managers, or penetration testers
Date: Wednesday & Thursday, April 11-12

Course Summary:
Course Details & Instructor Bio

Come take the official two-day Samurai-WTF training course given by one of the founders and lead developers of the project! You will learn the latest Samurai-WTF open source tools and as well as the latest techniques to perform web application penetration tests. After a quick overview of pen testing methodology, the instructors will lead you through the end-to-end process of testing and exploiting several different web applications, including client side attacks using flaws within the application. Different sets of open source tools will be used on each web application, allowing you to learn first hand the pros and cons of each tool. Primary emphasis of these instructor lead exercises is how to integrate these tools into your own manual testing procedures to improve your overall workflow. After you have gained experience with the Samurai-WTF tools, you will be challenged with a capture the flag event. This final challenge will give you time to practice your new skills at your own pace and experiment with your favorite new tools. This experience will help you gain the confidence and knowledge necessary to perform web application assessments and expose you to the wealth of freely available, open source tools.


Mobile Penetration Testing: Start to Finish for iOS apps

Trainer: Jason Haddix
Audience: Technical
Level: Basic, Intermediate
Date: Date: Wednesday & Thursday, April 11-12

Course Summary:
Mobile apps are the new horizon for penetration testing and assessment. This class will go from start to finish on how to:

  • Overview of Iphone platform
  • Overview of 3rd Party application Threat Models
  • Overview of Xcode and Obj-C
  • Setup a mobile Penetration Testing lab/environment
  • Performing Blackbox Assessments
  • Performing Whitebox Assessment
  • Finding Common Client/Phone Vulnerabilities
  • Finding Common Server-side Vulnerabilities
  • Tips and Tricks


This training is good for both new and seasoned mobile app security consultants.

Note: Students will need developer Apple licence, Xcode, Laptop


Jason Haddix is the Director of Penetration Testing at HP and develops and trains internal candidates on the mobile penetration testing team. He also has done several training for web application hacking and network penetration testing.


Hack Your Own Code: Advanced Training for Developers

Trainer: Mike Park & Marc Bown
Audience: Technical, Programmers
Level: Intermediate, Advanced, Programmers
Date: Wednesday & Thursday, April 11-12

Course Summary:
Course Outline

This class provides developers an exciting chance to hone their programming skills while also learning to exploit common web vulnerabilities. Unlike most training, this will not use static demos based on pre-canned source code. Students will program small parts of a larger application during the class’s lab periods. After the component has been written, students will review the code for the vulnerability being focused on in the lab. Vulnerable code will be run on a class-accessible server while the instructor guides students through exploiting the vulnerabilities. After the vulnerability has exploited, students will be shown how their own code can be fixed (if it was vulnerable) and the best way to prevent the flaw in the first place.

This full process will be performed for all major code vulnerabilities in the OWASP Top Ten. Exploitation and patching labs (but not programming) will be held for other vulnerabilities, including logic flaws that are hard to represent on the Top Ten. Several labs will feature prizes for the students that first find or exploit the targeted vulnerability. Environments and examples will be setup for all major platforms requested by pre-registered students. Students should bring a laptop with them, preferably with VMWare Player already installed. A virtual machine based on the OWASP Live Boot CD will be provided for lab work. The virtual machine will include development tools, but students should feel free to bring their favorite programs too.

Unlike many classes, this will allow programmers to focus on their own code. This makes the class far more interactive than a typical secure development class. The focus on lab work engage the students and make it a far more memorable experience.


Mike Park is a Managing Consultant at Trustwave. He is a member of Trustwave's SpiderLabs - the advanced security team focused on penetration testing, incident response, and application security. He has over 12 years experience building and securing software for a variety of companies. Mike is a CISSP and specializes in application security assessment, penetration testing, reverse engineering and secure development life cycle. Mike is an active member of the Ottawa ISSA.


One Day Training Courses

CANCELLED Threat Modeling: From the "cloud" on down CANCELLED

Trainer: Matt Tesauro
Audience: Technical
Level: Basic, Intermediate
Date: Wednesday April 11

Course Summary:
Everyone knows that catching software vulnerabilities early is the best way to create secure software with the least cost (and drama). However, how do you do this in the Agile, Cloud-based application environment that we face today? This training walks you trough an overview of threat modeling techniques and tools with an eye on pragmatic solutions to real world problems. Using the topics covered in this class, you will learn how to determine and describe an applications attack surface, understand the probability of an attack while gaining insight into its impact. Whether you're looking to find design flaws early, eliminate low-hanging vulnerabilities or improve and optimize testing, the discussion and hands-on portions of this class provide real-world examples of application security. The hands-on portion draws lessons from actual software such as those powering web-scale, cloud software stacks allowing you to gain practical experience working through tough software problems.

Matt Tesauro has worked in web application development and security since 2000. He has worn many different hats, from developer to DBA to System Administrator to Penetration Tester. Matt also taught graduate and undergraduate classes on web application development and XML at Texas A&M University. Currently, he's focused on application security risk assessments at Praetorian. Outside work, he is the project lead for the OWASP Live CD / WTE, a member of the OWASP Foundation board, and part of the Austin OWASP chapter leadership. Matt Tesauro has a B.S. in Economics and a M.S in Management Information Systems from Texas A&M University. He is also has the CISSP, CEH (Certified Ethical Hacker), RHCE (Red Hat Certified Engineer), and Linux+ certifications.


Mobile Applications & Security

Trainers: Prashant Verma & Dinesh Shetty
Audience: Management, Technical, Operations
Level: Basic, Intermediate, People with a background in security but no prior knowledge of mobile applications
Date: Thursday, April 12

Course Summary:
This course covers security tests that are conducted on mobile applications with a focus on iOS and Android platforms.

Students will first learn the basics of mobile applications followed by a brief background of iOS and Android platforms, their security models and an overview of their development basics.

They will then learn how to model a threat profile for mobile applications and then test and debug the mobile applications for security vulnerabilities.

Reading locally stored data in mobiles, setting up a proxy to intercept and test network traffic and reversing Android applications will be a few of the topics discussed. We will also discuss the challenges involved in reversing an iOS application. The course includes examples for both the platforms and sample code snippets will also be provided.

We will also discuss the best practices that have to be followed for secure development of mobile applications. The course would end with a discussion of the OWASP Mobile Top 10 risks.


Prashant Verma is a Senior Security Consultant and Competency Lead at Paladion Networks. He has 6 years of experience. He drives the Mobile Application Security Service and Research at Paladion. He is the co-author of the "Security Testing Handbook for Banking Applications". He has also authored security articles for the Hacki9 and Palisade magazines. He has given presentations at Club Hack 2011 on "Pentesting Mobile Applications". He has also given guest lectures and security trainings at various occasions, which include the National Institute of Bank Management (NIBM) and Babasaheb Ambedkar Marathwada University (BAMU). He is a "Digital Evidence Analyst" i.e. he has conducted Mobile Security Testing, Java, Android and iOS Security Code Reviews. He has also conducted numerous application and network penetration tests, vulnerability assessments, etc.


Dinesh Shetty is currently working as an Information Security Consultant at Paladion Networks. He is the principal researcher in the Mobile Application Security Team at Paladion, having developed Paladion's Android, iOS and BlackBerry Gray Box and Code Review checklists, and has trained 30+ engineers to detect security flaws in mobile applications. He has found flaws in leading Web and Mobile-based financial applications and helped the respective organizations fix those vulnerabilities. He has authored many white papers on information security and network-related research, which have been published in multiple information security magazines and international journals such as Packet Storm, Exploit-DB and the PenTest Magazine among others. He has conducted technical trainings and given presentations about various platforms for multiple customers and reputed institutes like the National Institute of Bank Management (NIBM). He is a Certified Ethical Hacker and an IBM Certified AppScan Specialist.


OWASP for CISO and Senior Managers

Trainer: Tobias Gondrom
Audience: Management
Level: Basic, Intermediate, Advanced
Date: Thursday, April 12

Course Summary:
Setting up, managing and improving your global information security organisation using mature OWASP projects and tools. Achieving cost-effective application security and bringing it all together on the management level. How to use and leverage OWASP and other common best practices to improve your security programs and organization. The workshop will also discuss a number of quick wins and how to effectively use OWASP tools inside your organisation. The author has extensive experience of managing his own secure development organization as well as advising to improve a number of global secure development organisations and processes.

Topics:

  • OWASP Top-10 and OWASP projects - how to use within your organisation
  • Risk management and threat modeling methods (OWASP risk analysis, ISO-27005,...)
  • Benchmarking & Maturity Models
  • Organisational Design for global information security programs
  • SDLC
  • Training: OWASP Secure Coding Practices - Quick Reference Guide, Development Guide, Training tools for developers
  • Measuring & Verification: ASVS (Application Security Verification Standard) Project, Code Review Guide, Testing Guide
  • Development & Operation: ESAPI (Enterprise Security API), AppSensor


Target audience: CISO and senior head of information security managers (VP/director level) - maximum number of seats should be limited to 20, only senior information security managers/leaders will be admitted.


All discussion and issues raised by participants at the workshop will be under the confidentiality under the Chatham House Rule (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chatham_House_Rule).


Tobias Gondrom is Managing Director of an IT Security & Risk Management Advisory based in the United Kingdom and Germany. He has twelve years of experience in software development, application security, cryptography, electronic signatures and global standardisation organisations working for independent software vendors and large global corporations in the financial, technology and government sector, in America, EMEA and APAC. As the Global Head of the Security Team at Open Text (2005-2007) and from 2000-2004 as the lead of the Security Task Force at IXOS Software AG, he was responsible for security, risk and incident management and introduced and implemented a secure SDLC used globally by development departments in the US, Canada, UK and Germany.

Since 2003 he is the chair of working groups of the IETF (www.ietf.org) in the security area, member of the IETF security directorate, and since 2010 chair of the formed web security WG at the IETF, and a former chapter lead of the German OWASP chapter from 2007 to 2008 and board member of OWASP London. Tobias is the author of the international standards RFC 4998, RFC 6283 and co-author and contributor to a number of internet standards and papers on security and electronic signatures, as well as the co-author of the book „Secure Electronic Archiving“, and frequent presenter at conferences and publication of articles (e.g. AppSec, ISSE, Moderner Staat, IETF, VOI-booklet “Electronic Signature“, iX).


Building Secure Web Applications

Trainer: Klaus Johannes Rusch
Audience: Management, Technical, Operations
Level: Basic, Intermediate
Date: Wednesday, April 11

Course Summary:
Course Outline

Web application security breaches on websites of major corporations and government entities have received significant media attention due to large number of users affected and the leaking of sensitive personal information.

This training will show how to develop secure Web applications and covers security aspects of the full software development life cycle (SDLC). Participants will learn about general security concepts and review common risks, including OWASP’s Top 10 list, assess the technical and business impact of security risks and apply mitigation strategies. The training includes several hands-on labs covering implementation, white-box analysis and black-box testing for security. While most code examples use PHP, MySQL and JavaScript, the content is equally applicable to other programming languages and database engines.

Participants are welcome to bring Web applications or code samples for review during the training also.


Klaus Johannes Rusch is a certified IT architect and manager at IBM, heading the Web Effectiveness group in the Global Web Services organization, which provides consulting services to business units in IBM for optimizing the Web experience as an in-house agency. Previously he was a team leader on the IBM Corporate Webmaster team that manages www.ibm.com.

Klaus Johannes Rusch has over 20 years of application development experience and a track record of hacking web applications. He received an award for best website back in 1995. He holds an MSc degree in computer science from Vienna University of Technology and was an adjunct professor of computer science at Webster University, where he taught web development and web animation. He lives in Vienna, Austria with his wife and two kids, and online at http://klausrusch.atmedia.net/.


NOTE: Conference is scheduled to change as required by the conference committee, check back for updates prior to the conference.

Conference Day 1 - Friday - April 13th


(Time Allocated) Track 1 - Detect
(Grand Ballroom 2)
Track 2 - Protect
(Grand Ballroom 3)
Track 3 - Leadership & OWASP
(Grand Ballroom 1)
 7:30 - 8:30 AM


Conference Registration Open - Coffee & Tea Available
 8:30-8:40 AM


Conference Opening - Appsec Asia 2012

Speakers: Conference Committee Chair - Mr. Justin Derry

 8:40-9:30 AM


KeyNote: Presentation

Speaker: Alastair MacGibbon

 9:30-9:40 AM Short Break - Conference Movement
 9:40-10:30 AM


KeyNote: Software Security Goes Mobile

Speaker: Jacob West

 10:30-11:00 AM


Break - Morning Tea - Provided for attendees in main EXPO & Conference Hall - Ground Level
 11:00-11:50 AM


 You can't filter the stupid!

 Speakers: Charles Henderson & Daniel Crowley

 Advanced Mobile Application Code Review Techniques

 Speakers: Prashant Vema & Dinesh Shetty

 Effective Software Development in a PCI-DSS Environment

 Speaker: Bruce Ashton

 11:50-12:00 PM Short Break - Conference Movement
 12:00-12:50 PM


 The risks that Pen Tests don't find

 Speaker: Gary Gaskell

 Rethinking Web Application Architecture for Cloud

 Speaker: Arshad Noor

 OWASP Project - Secure Coding Practices Quick Reference Guide

 Speaker: Justin Clarke

 12:50-1:30 PM


Break - Lunch - Provided for attendees in main Expo & Conference Hall - Ground Level
 1:30-2:20 PM


 Overcoming the Quality vs Quantity Problem in Software Security Testing

 Speaker: Rafal Los

 Mobile Security on iOS and Andriod

 Speaker: Mike Park

 Effective Education Programs using OWASP

 Speaker: Sandeep Nain

 2:20-2:30 PM Short Break - Conference Movement
 2:30-3:20 PM


 Pen Testing Mobile Applications

 Speaker: Tony Liu & Rainman Wu

 Application Security Logging & Monitoring, The Next Frontier

 Speaker: Peter Freiberg

 Modern Software Security Assurance with OpenSAMM

 Speaker: Pravir Chandra

 3:30-4:00 PM


Break - Afternoon Tea - Provided for attendees in EXPO & Conference Hall - Ground Level
 4:00-4:50 PM


 Harder, Better, Faster, Stronger (SQLi)

 Speakers: Luke Jahnke & Louis Nyffenegger

 Securing the SSL Channel against Man-in-the-middle Attacks

 Speaker: Tobias Gondrom

 OWASP Project - ZED Attack Proxy

 Speaker: Simon Bennetts

 4:50-5:00 PM Short Break - Conference Movement
 5:00-5:30 PM


Panel Discussion - Application Security Trends in 2012

Moderator: Christian Frichot, Panelists: To be Announced

 5:30-6:30 PM


OWASP - Afternoon Networking Event - Ground Floor - Four Points Sheraton
 6:30 - 10:00 PM


OWASP - Gala Dinner - Grand Ballroom. (Inclusive in Conference Fee)
Speaker: Tammy Wolffs - Director, Cyber Security at
Department of Broadband, Communications and the Digital Economy



Conference Day 2 - Saturday- April 14th


(Time Allocated) Track 1 - Detect
(Grand Ballroom 2)
Track 2 - Protect
(Grand Ballroom 3)
Track 3 - Leadership & OWASP
(Grand Ballroom 1)
 7:30 - 8:30 AM


Conference Registration Open - Coffee & Tea Available
 8:30-8:40 AM


Conference Day 2 Update- Appsec Asia 2012

Speakers: Conference Committee Chair - Mr Justin Derry

 8:40-9:30 AM


KeyNote: Presentation

Speaker: Jeremiah Grossman

 9:30-9:40 AM Short Break - Conference Movement
 9:40-10:30 AM


KeyNote: OWASP Foundation Update

Speakers: Justin Searle and Justin Clarke

 10:30-11:00 AM


Break - Morning Tea - Provided for attendees in main EXPO & Conference Hall - Ground Level
 11:00-11:50 AM


 Pentesting iOS Applications:

 Speaker: Jason Haddix

 Password Less Authentication & Authorization & Payments

 Speaker: Srikar Sagi

 De-Anonymizing Anonymous

 Speaker: Wayne O'Young

 11:50-12:00 PM Short Break - Conference Movement
 12:00-12:50 PM


 HTTP Fingerprinting - Next Generation

 Speaker: Eldar Marcussen

 Web Crypto for the Developer who has better things to do.

 Speaker: Adrian Hayes

 Static Code Analysis & Governance

 Speaker: Jonathan Carter

 12:50-1:30 PM


Break - Lunch - Provided for attendees in main Expo & Conference Hall - Ground Level
 1:30-2:20 PM


 Shake Hooves with BeEF

 Speaker: Christian Frichot

 Data Breaches - When Application Security Goes Wrong

 Speaker: Mark Goudie

SPONSOR PRESENTATION
 Next Generation WAF

 Speaker: GA Systems

 2:20-2:30 PM Short Break - Conference Movement
 2:30-3:20 PM


 Pentesting Smart Grid Web Apps

 Speaker: Justin Searle

 How MITM Proxy has been slaying SSL Dragons

 Speaker: Jim Cheetham

SPONSOR PRESENTATION
 TBA

 Speaker: Trustwave Spiderlabs

 3:20-3:30 PM Short Break - Conference Movement
 3:30-4:20 PM


 Rise of the Planet of the Anonymous

 Speaker: Errazudin Ishak

 Anatomy of a Logic Flaw

 Speakers: Charles Henderson & Daniel Crowley

SPONSOR PRESENTATION
 Websense

 Speaker: Content Security

 4:20-4:30 PM Short Break - Conference Movement
 4:30-5:00 PM


OWASP Appsec Asia 2012 - Conference Wrap Up

Speakers: OWASP Board, OWASP Appsec Asia Conference Committee

 5:00-6:00 PM


OWASP Sponsor - Afternoon Networking Event - TBA



In alphabetical order:


Alastair MacGibbon

Alastair MacGibbon is an internationally-respected authority on cybercrime, including Internet fraud, consumer victimisation and a range of Internet security and safety issues. He is the managing partner of Surete Group, a consultancy dealing with improved customer retention for Internet companies by increasing trust and reducing negative user experiences. Prior to this for almost 5 years Alastair headed Trust & Safety at eBay Australia and later eBay Asia Pacific. He was a Federal Agent with the Australian Federal Police for 15 years, his final assignment as the founding Director of the Australian High Tech Crime Centre.


Jacob West

Jacob West is Director, Software Security Research for the Enterprise Security Products division of Hewlett-Packard. West is a world-recognized expert on software security and brings a technical understanding of the languages and frameworks used to build software together with extensive knowledge about how real-world systems fail. In 2007, he co-authored the book "Secure Programming with Static Analysis" with colleague and Fortify founder Brian Chess. Today, the book remains the only comprehensive guide to static analysis and how developers can use it to avoid the most prevalent and dangerous vulnerabilities in code. West is a frequent speaker at industry events, including RSA Conference, Black Hat, Defcon, OWASP, and many others. A graduate of the University of California, Berkeley, West holds dual-degrees in Computer Science and French and resides in San Francisco, California.


Dr. Jason Smith from CERT Australia

Dr Jason Smith is an assistant director at the national CERT, CERT Australia, which is part of the Attorney-General's Department. He is an experienced cyber security researcher and consultant, having provided consultancy services over the last decade on information infrastructure protection to government and critical infrastructure utilities.

Since joining government Jason has been involved in the development and execution national scale cyber exercises and the advanced cyber security training for control systems conducted by the US Department of Homeland Security.

Jason holds a degree in software engineering and data communications, a PhD in information security and is an Adjunct Associate Professor at the Queensland University of Technology.

About CERT Australia


Jeremiah Grossman

Jeremiah Grossman is the Founder and CTO of WhiteHat Security, where he is responsible for Web security R&D and industry outreach. Mr. Grossman has written dozens of articles, white papers, and is a published author. His work has been featured in the Wall Street Journal, NY Times and many other mainstream media outlets. As a well-known security expert and industry veteran, Mr. Grossman has been a guest speaker on five continents at hundreds of events including BlackHat, RSA, ISSA, and others. He has been invited to guest lecture at top universities such as UC Berkeley, Stanford, Harvard, UoW Madison, UCLA, and Carnegie Mellon. Mr. Grossman is also a co-founder of the Web Application Security Consortium (WASC) and previously named one of InfoWorld's Top 25 CTOs. Before founding WhiteHat, Mr. Grossman was an information security officer at Yahoo!


Mr. Grossman was recently a speaker at TEDxMaui. Learn more here.


In alphabetical order:


Adrian Hayes

Web: http://security-assessment.com/

Bio: Adrian is a security consultant for the Security-Assessment.com assurance team, providing clients with security penetration testing services and security related advice. He has deep knowledge of secure application design & architecture, mobile device & application security, cryptography, and social engineering based attacks. Adrian is an active security researcher, and a regular contributor to the OWASP chapter in New Zealand.

Talk Abstract: Web Crypto for the Developer Who Has Better Things To Do

Cryptography is easy to get wrong and can be a pain to implement. This presentation will take you through practical examples of how to implement solid crypto on a number of common development platforms. We'll talk about how to store and verify passwords, how to safely transport and store backups. What's wrong with some default SSL configurations and maybe even random token generation among other things. Web app crypto should be easy and secure, not just one of those.


Arshad Noor


Bio: Arshad is the CTO of StrongAuth, Inc., a Silicon Valley-based company focused on enterprise key-management solutions. He has 25 years of experience in the Information Technology sector, of which, more than 12 were devoted to architecting and building key-management infrastructures for dozens of mission-critical environments around the world. He has been published in periodicals and journals, as well as authored XML-based protocols for two Technical Committees as OASIS. He is also a frequent speaker at forums such as RSA, ISACA, OWASP and the ISSE. He can be reached at arshad.noor@strongauth.com.

Talk Abstract: Rethinking web-application architectures for the Cloud

Unless your organization is unique, not all your data is sensitive. This raises the question: should scarce security resources be used to protect 100% of your data? The logical approach should be to build your IT infrastructure in a manner that optimizes your investments: protecting what matters while managing non-sensitive data with minimal controls.

This white-paper presents an architecture for building the next generation of web-applications. This architecture allows you to leverage emerging technologies such as cloud-computing, cloud-storage and enterprise key-management Infrastructure (EKMI) to derive benefits such as lower costs, faster time-to-market and immense scalability with smaller investments – while proving compliance to PCI-DSS, HIPAA/HITECH and similar data-security regulations. We call this Regulatory Compliant Cloud Computing, or RC3.

(More detail can be found at: http://www.infoq.com/articles/regulatory-compliant-cloud-computing).

Bruce Ashton


Bio: Bruce Ashton has been employed in web applications and development for 14 years, with experience ranging from startups to international blue-chip consultancies. He currently he works for Mako Networks, a network management and security service provider specializing in PCI DSS compliance solutions. Bruce specializes in developing secure software and applications, especially for banking and financial institutions.

His career began working to develop online banking websites for a Swiss banking group on behalf of Pricewaterhouse Coopers, before moving on to create shopping and commerce websites for Mini and Rolls Royce. At Integralis, a security company specializing in firewall monitoring, Bruce was responsible for data analysis and reporting tools. He has also worked for high-volume transaction processing provider Provenco.

He hails from the South Island of New Zealand.

Talk Abstract: Effective Software Development in a PCI DSS Environment

Compliance with the stringent Payment Card Industry Data Security Standards (PCI DSS) mandate a locked-down development environment. This is almost completely at odds with the normal working requirements of software developers. In fact, software developers typically like to be able to play and manipulate aspects of their computing environment as they develop new solutions – a scenario expressly forbidden under PCI DSS. Companies providing IT services to clients with PCI DSS requirements need to be compliant themselves. Often this means their developers need to work within a PCI DSS compliant environment.

This talk will discuss the six PCI DSS requirements and how they apply to source code, development tools and software development in general. It will cover the sorts of problems that development teams face when working under PCI DSS and some of the possible solutions, as discovered through firsthand experience.

Charles Henderson


Bio: Charles Henderson, Director of Application Security Services of SpiderLabs at Trustwave

Charles Henderson began his career in computer security in 1993, specializing in penetration testing as well as security and vulnerability research. As Director of Application Security Services at SpiderLabs, he leads the team responsible for Application Penetration Testing, Code Review, Secure Development Training, and other elite application security consulting services.

Prior to joining SpiderLabs, Henderson ran his own boutique application security testing firm. Henderson's firm provided offensive security services to a wide variety of clients in the United States and Europe.

Henderson speaks frequently at major industry events and conferences, including BlackHat, DEF CON, AppSec US, AppSec EU, SOURCE, and the International Association of Financial Crime Investigators convention.

Talk Abstract: Anatomy of a Logic Flaw

Traditional vulnerabilities like SQL Injection, buffer overflows, etc, have well established techniques for discovery and prevention. On the other hand, logic flaws are incredibly diverse and often unique to the specific application or business organization. Because of this, logic flaws have taken on a near mythical status. In the myth, logic flaws are nearly impossible to find until the elite of the elite hackers launch an attack to completely own the application.

The reality is far different; logic flaws are not the complex nightmare that many have made them out to be. This presentation will use real-world examples to show how logic flaws are typically introduced into an application, how they can be consistently detected during testing, and how they can be prevented during development. Instead of hoping for magic, repeatable processes will be outlined for each of those items. This will prove beneficial to anyone responsible for application security: programmers, architects, managers, and pen testers.


Talk Abstract: You Can't Filter "The Stupid"

Everyone wants to stretch their security budget as far as possible; in recent years, automated application security tools have become a popular choice for doing so. However, manual security testing isn’t going anywhere until the HAL-9000 application scanner/web app firewall comes online. While automated tools may be tempting, the reality is that only manual application testing provides strong protection against modern threats. Companies that are serious about application security and have reviewed both options are consistently choosing manual testing.

Logic flaws may not get the press that vulnerabilities like SQL Injection or Cross-Site Scripting (XSS) do, but they can be devastating to an application. Every application is going to have its own unique set of logic, so it is impossible to automate tests for logic vulnerabilities. Because logic flaws often require no “hacking” skills, standard users often discover the vulnerabilities on their own. Examples from Trustwave penetration tests range from the simple – such as a shopping cart application that accepts bogus coupon codes – to the very complex – sensitive information disclosure by combining query results across multiple systems.

Many vulnerabilities are simply too complicated to practically detect with an automated tool. For example, it is very common for web applications to provide complex data structures such as serialized objects to the web browser. Examples of such frameworks or techniques include Microsoft’s .Net, Java ServerFaces, JSON, and Adobe Flex. Since a developer can place any type of data in these structures, an automated tool cannot be expected to reliably test them. Analyzing these structures can be a very complex process that requires the ability to understand the data in the context of the application.

An experienced penetration tester can identify complicated vulnerabilities in the same way that a human attacker does. Humans can comprehend the intention of the developer in how the application is designed and intended to operate. Understanding this is critical for identifying how the system can be subverted. Human testers can also deduce business logic rules, even if they are not explicitly documented. When business requirements are documented and provided to the tester, the quality of testing is even greater.

Manual source code reviews present even more benefits by identifying vulnerabilities that require access to source code. Examples include “hidden” or unused application components, which may have been left intentionally as backdoors by disgruntled developers. There are many forms of blind SQL injection with no evidence in the response, exotic injection attacks (e.g. mainframe session attacks), vulnerabilities in back-end systems, and intentional backdoors.

Christian "xntrik" Frichot

Web: http://labs.asteriskinfosec.com.au/

Bio: I'm an information security professional based out of Perth, Western Australia. I've been working in the banking industry for the past 5 years and prior to that for a resources company for a number of years. These days I work for a newly created boutique security firm Asterisk based out of Perth. After initially confusing the BeEF project for something to do with cooking the ultimate steak, I've found myself involved with the open source tool development over the past 2 years, working primarily in module development, core testing, architecture, public relations and acting as the vice president in charge of volcanoes. Apart from BeEF, I'm also one of the Perth OWASP Chapter leads, kicking around talking to everyone I can about application security and keeping safe online.

Talk Abstract: Shake Hooves With BeEF

When was the last time you performed a penetration test and were able to successfully exploit a publicly accessible, vulnerable Apache instance? Or maybe the old-days where you could safely knock away for hours on an exposed FTP service until the username password combination clicked together. Like it or not, external perimeter controls have become so simple and ubiquitous these days you rarely come across ‘trivial-to-exploit’ systems, in fact, when was the last time you came across a small-to-medium (or larger) enterprise that didn’t use web-proxying services for their colleagues when browsing the net? We’ve seen how attackers are actively exploiting the trust and the ‘soft-gooey-juicy-ness’ of the internal network to perform various feats of exploitation (RSA anyone?), and this is where a nice slab of BeEF can really come in handy. A reasonable sized corporate is making 700,000 HTTP requests every work day. This attack surface needs to be tested.

The Browser Exploitation Framework is designed to assist the penetration tester in leveraging the power of the web-browser to scan internal networks, exploit other systems, proxy requests or basically anything else you can think of doing with javascript.


You are sure to walk away with a better understanding of how the BeEF framework fits in to your pen-testing toolkit along side your Metasploit and Burp.

Daniel Crowley


Bio: Daniel is an Application Security Consultant for Trustwave's SpiderLabs team. He has been working in the information security industry for over 7 years and has been focused on penetration testing. Daniel denies all allegations regarding unicorn smuggling and questions your character for even suggesting it. Daniel has developed configurable testbeds such as SQLol and XMLmao for training and research regarding specific vulnerabilities. Daniel enjoys climbing large rocks. Daniel is a frequent speaker at conferences including DEFCON, Shmoocon, and SOURCE. Daniel does his own Charcuterie.

Talk Abstract: Anatomy of a Logic Flaw

Traditional vulnerabilities like SQL Injection, buffer overflows, etc, have well established techniques for discovery and prevention. On the other hand, logic flaws are incredibly diverse and often unique to the specific application or business organization. Because of this, logic flaws have taken on a near mythical status. In the myth, logic flaws are nearly impossible to find until the elite of the elite hackers launch an attack to completely own the application.

The reality is far different; logic flaws are not the complex nightmare that many have made them out to be. This presentation will use real-world examples to show how logic flaws are typically introduced into an application, how they can be consistently detected during testing, and how they can be prevented during development. Instead of hoping for magic, repeatable processes will be outlined for each of those items. This will prove beneficial to anyone responsible for application security: programmers, architects, managers, and pen testers.


Talk Abstract: You Can't Filter "The Stupid"

Everyone wants to stretch their security budget as far as possible; in recent years, automated application security tools have become a popular choice for doing so. However, manual security testing isn’t going anywhere until the HAL-9000 application scanner/web app firewall comes online. While automated tools may be tempting, the reality is that only manual application testing provides strong protection against modern threats. Companies that are serious about application security and have reviewed both options are consistently choosing manual testing.

Logic flaws may not get the press that vulnerabilities like SQL Injection or Cross-Site Scripting (XSS) do, but they can be devastating to an application. Every application is going to have its own unique set of logic, so it is impossible to automate tests for logic vulnerabilities. Because logic flaws often require no “hacking” skills, standard users often discover the vulnerabilities on their own. Examples from Trustwave penetration tests range from the simple – such as a shopping cart application that accepts bogus coupon codes – to the very complex – sensitive information disclosure by combining query results across multiple systems.

Many vulnerabilities are simply too complicated to practically detect with an automated tool. For example, it is very common for web applications to provide complex data structures such as serialized objects to the web browser. Examples of such frameworks or techniques include Microsoft’s .Net, Java ServerFaces, JSON, and Adobe Flex. Since a developer can place any type of data in these structures, an automated tool cannot be expected to reliably test them. Analyzing these structures can be a very complex process that requires the ability to understand the data in the context of the application.

An experienced penetration tester can identify complicated vulnerabilities in the same way that a human attacker does. Humans can comprehend the intention of the developer in how the application is designed and intended to operate. Understanding this is critical for identifying how the system can be subverted. Human testers can also deduce business logic rules, even if they are not explicitly documented. When business requirements are documented and provided to the tester, the quality of testing is even greater.

Manual source code reviews present even more benefits by identifying vulnerabilities that require access to source code. Examples include “hidden” or unused application components, which may have been left intentionally as backdoors by disgruntled developers. There are many forms of blind SQL injection with no evidence in the response, exotic injection attacks (e.g. mainframe session attacks), vulnerabilities in back-end systems, and intentional backdoors.

Dinesh Shetty


Bio: Dinesh Shetty is currently working as an Information Security Consultant at Paladion Networks. He is the principal researcher in the Mobile Application Security Team at Paladion, having developed Paladion's Android, iOS and BlackBerry Gray Box and Code Review checklists, and has trained 30+ engineers to detect security flaws in mobile applications. He has found flaws in leading Web and Mobile-based financial applications and helped the respective organizations fix those vulnerabilities. He has authored many white papers on information security and network-related research, which have been published in multiple information security magazines and international journals such as Packet Storm, Exploit-DB and the PenTest Magazine among others. He has conducted technical trainings and given presentations about various platforms for multiple customers and reputed institutes like the National Institute of Bank Management (NIBM). He is a Certified Ethical Hacker and an IBM Certified AppScan Specialist.

Talk Abstract: Advanced Mobile Application Code Review Techniques

Learn how Mobile experts blend their techniques in order to accelerate code reviews. While reviewing Android or iOS applications, you will love these handy tricks that help in detecting famous and a few not-so-famous flaws. Using demonstrations and code snippets, we will highlight the benefits of blended techniques in comparison with those of simple scanning or manual testing. You will also learn how to reduce the time taken for review and obtain a ready-to-use checklist.


Eldar Marcussen

Web: http://www.justanotherhacker.com

Bio: Eldar is a principal consultant and researcher at stratsec, where he helps organisations test their security and protect intellectual property. He is a perl advocate and in his spare time works on several open source projects aimed at secure web application development and testing. Eldar has presented at AISA and Ruxcon and worked with some of Australia’s leading hosting, search engine optimization and domain parking service providers providing design and security guidance.

Talk Abstract: HTTP Fingerprinting - the next generation

The next generation of HTTP Fingerprinting - builds on existing web server fingerprinting research to accurately detect and identify load balancers, web application firewalls, reverse proxies and web servers. Through in-depth analysis of HTTP traffic it is possible to detect and identify intermediate agents. Some of these techniques can also be used to identify server configuration such as loaded modules.

Today’s tools for identifying web technologies don’t do an adequate job of identifying the sub-components comprising the architecture. Most HTTP based fingerprinting tools only focus on fingerprinting the web server(s) on the target or behind the load balancer. While there are some tools that identify load balancing, namely halberd and lbd, these tools focus on enumerating the actual back ends without any fingerprinting.

By taking HTTP fingerprinting to the next level we can detect and identify both the intermediate agents and the web server. There are some tools aimed at detecting web application firewalls, for example waffit/wafW00f, relies on strings commonly used in malicious payloads to detect if requests are blocked by the web application firewall. Through fault injection and fuzzing of vaguely defined (RFC 2616) request properties I was able to identify distinct responses in intermediary HTTP agents without relying on default/common WAF rules to be enabled.

These tools and techniques will enable target identification to be more effective, and speed up the process of detecting potentially vulnerable systems that are normally transparent.

Two tools will be released along with the presentation: • lbmap – Identifies and fingerprints load balancers, WAFs, reverse proxies and web servers. • aprof – Profiles apache configuration, including determining which modules are loaded.

Errazudin Ishak

Web: http://www.mimos.my

Bio: Errazudin holds a Master’s degree in Computer Science (Sofware Engineering) and works as Staff Engineer at Mimos Berhad, a Malaysian government research arm, in ICT and frontier technology. His job focuses on web application development, deployment, security, performance and stability. He has spoken at several meetups and conferences and has worked with various back-end and web technologies for almost 11 years. In his free time he loves to emulate Rafael Nadal’s swerving forehand on court.

Talk Abstract: Rise of the Planet of the Anonymous

Welcome to Planet of the Anonymous. Where all system wranglers from every inch of Planet Earth really ‘hate’(or love?) them. The abominable avenger hacker group ‘Anonymous’ has become in many parts of the world as the modern-day Robin Hood of the Internet. Their approach of ‘stealing from the rich’ however is to strike hard at websites of anyone they see as cruel of freedom of speech and freedom of information. Their notorious hacktivism feats since 2008 can be list down, involving Project Chanology, Playstation Network, Bay Area Rapit Transit, Operation Payback, Wall Street, Darknet and many more. There are some good and bad points with Anonymous existence. The main good thing among others is, they have brought up the level of awareness for web application security at every possible level. This talk will discuss about web application security audit, things that you can look at to beef up extra security to your apps and why a lowly application security scanner based approach doesn't help that much.

Frank Fan


Bio: Frank Fan: CTO of DBAPPSecurity Mr. Frank Fan was graduated from California State University as a Computer Science PhD. With more than ten years of technical research and project management experience in world famous security companies, Mr. Frank Fan researched deeply about online security, database security and auditing and compliance( such as SOX, PCI, ISO17799/27001). Because of his successful technological innovation in information security, he become the first Chinese who made a speech in the World’s top security conference BLACKHAT and he has certificates such as CISSP, CISA, GCIH, GCIA, etc.

Right now, Mr. Frank Fan is the vice president of OWASP China and member of 2008 Olympic Organizing Committee security group.

Talk Abstract: Pentesting mobile Applications

1、iPhone&adnriod App Basics App development App distribution 2、Pentesting iPhone Apps Methodology Areas of focus 3、Pentesting adnriod Apps Methodology Areas of focus 4、Major Mobile Threats

Gary Gaskell


Bio: Gary Gaskell is a highly regarded information and ICT security specialist serving the ICT industry for 18 years. He has published 36 articles in Australia and internationally. He combines excellent communications and business analysis skills with a thorough of technical and managerial security controls.

His career highlights include:

  1. Being the first to define how to integrate smart cards into the Kerberos authentication system,
  2. Defining the security architectures for Internet and telephone banking systems,
  3. Designing and building the security for a classified Defence support system,
  4. Developing both the technical and managerial security plans for new enterprise class systems,
  5. Developing pragmatic security plans for process control systems (SCADA),
  6. Leading security reviews for formal audit functions.

Gary is a Certified Information System Security Professional (CISSP), a Certified Information System Auditor (CISA), Certified Information Security Manager (CISM) and a Certified Specialist (SBCI) by the Business Continuity Institute.

Talk Abstract: The risks that pen tests don't find

Penetrations tests are a crucial element of an organisation's security plan. This is not likely to change in the near term. However, there are several security risks that pen tests don't detect.

This presentation will give an overview of this class of security risks and how to identify them. A focus will be on the emerging risks of using virtual server and storage infrastructure to host web applications - particularly where organisations use the internal SAN to provide storage to web applications.

The talk will inform attendees about where to get the reference information from and how to test or inspect the security settings using the philosophy that this should not be a black art but just normal IT security practice.


Jacob West

Web: http://www.hpenterprisesecurity.com

Bio: Jacob West is CTO and Director of Security Research for the Fortify product line in HP Enterprise Security. West is a world-recognized expert on software security and brings a technical understanding of the languages and frameworks used to build software together with extensive knowledge about how real-world systems fail. In 2007, he co-authored the book "Secure Programming with Static Analysis" with colleague and Fortify founder Brian Chess. Today, the book remains the only comprehensive guide to static analysis and how developers can use it to avoid the most prevalent and dangerous vulnerabilities in code. West is a frequent speaker at industry events, including RSA Conference, Black Hat, Defcon, OWASP, and many others. A graduate of the University of California, Berkeley, West holds dual-degrees in Computer Science and French and resides in San Francisco, California.

Talk Abstract: Software Security goes Mobile

In the past decade, mobile devices have led one of the most rapid and widespread technology shifts since the advent of the computer. Studies show that users rely heavily on their mobile devices for a variety of tasks—ranging from shopping to scheduling doctor’s appointments—that would have previously taken them to a laptop or desktop. In the near future, smartphone sales will surpass both feature phone sales in North America and PC sales worldwide. With less than ten percent of the world’s population left uncovered by cellular signals, the rate of adoption shows no sign of slowing.

As society’s reliance on mobile devices grows, so too does the risk posed by vulnerabilities in the software that drives them. In this talk we scrutinize the challenges involved in building secure mobile applications. Throughout, we call attention to differences and similarities between traditional software security assurance initiatives and those focused on mobile. We discuss how frequent reliance on outsourcing complicates security efforts and how the diversification of parties with an interest in mobile security makes assigning accountability for risks tenuous.

Despite lifecycle differences, many mobile applications are simply new clients backed by existing web applications or services and are therefore subject to the same threats they’ve always faced. We review old threats in the new mobile context and go on to discuss threats unique to the mobile landscape, including: attacks against client-side data persistence, MMS, or GPS; malicious inter-application communication; problems with new security features, such as confusing permission models. We conclude the talk with a frank assessment of what software development organizations can do to take control and avoid being the weakest link in the chain of mobile security.

Jason Haddix


Bio: Jason Haddix is the Director of Penetration Testing at HP and develops and trains internal candidates on the mobile penetration testing team. He also has done several training for web application hacking and network penetration testing.



Talk Abstract: Pentesting iOS Applications


3rd party iOS applications are a tricky animal. In contrast to Android applications written in a language like java, Objective-C, the iOS runtime, and the vulnerabilities baked into the platform are a new area for auditors, QA, and pentesters. I will present some of these vulnerabilities through both the lens of blackbox and whitebox testing, illustrating dynamic testing techniques and static review techniques. I will also debut a few new simple demos for security professionals to work through in the OWASP iGoat application, the vulnerable iPhone mobile application for learning.

Jim Cheetham


Bio: Jim has been working with Internet-connected services for over 20 years, covering fields from systems administration to architecture for companies of all sizes.

In the security field, he has run a busy department managing networking and security for a number of large government clients in NZ, and is now to be found in the Information Security Office at the University of Otago.

Talk Abstract: How MITMproxy has been slaying SSL Dragons

MITMproxy is an extensible HTTP/HTTPS interactive or programmable man-in-the-middle proxy, aimed at security researchers and web developers. This presentation introduces the project http://mitmproxy.org/, and demonstrates how easy it is to use to intercept and modify HTTP traffic, even when carried over HTTPS.

It is of particular use in situations where you cannot install arbitrary software on the end-point, but you can install SSL certificates and configure a proxy; such as with mobile devices like iOS.

Recently there have been a number of high-profile publications revealing how mobile device application vendors have been transmitting inappropriate data back to their servers; MITMproxy has often been the tool used to discover these. You will see how this has been done, and also how MITMproxy can use straightforward Python code to extend your decoding abilities to collect cleartext despite ad-hoc obfuscation or even high-grade encryption.

MITMproxy is quick to use, easy to get started with, and capable of great things; it is a great tool in the arsenal of a web developer trying to debug what is happening inside an HTTPS connection, or of a security researcher trying to protect your privacy online.

Jonathan Carter


Bio: Jonathan has been working in the IT industry for the past 10 years. During this time, he has participated in a large number of diverse projects within Canada, the United States, and Australia and posses a broad range of technical and leadership skills.

First, he earned a Bachelors of Computer Engineering with a major in Software Engineering at the prestigious University of Waterloo in Canada. Afterwards, he went on to earn a Masters in Computer Science with a major in Artificial Intelligence. Within Artificial Intelligence, he developed models of trust within computer security. He has many patents and publications relating to his research within the field.

Jonathan has participated in many different aspects of application security. These include: governance engagements; seminar development; training delivery with clients; risk management projects; framework development; ethical penetration testing; and secure code reviews.

In California, Jonathan was a security researcher specialising in static code analysis for a dominant player in this market space.

Talk Abstract: Static Code Analysis and Governance

Organisations love to use static code analysis tools to review their source code for application-security vulnerabilities. Often, vendors of these tools project a very ideal and rosy image of a tool that scans, detects, and reports all of your serious application vulnerabilities. The image looks great. Predictable, stable, and complete detection of application-security issues without having to be an expert in security. Clients often buy into the imagery of a technology that can serve as a panacea to all of their application-security issues without having to have the security experience or specialized knowledge.

Unfortunately, there are a lot of technical issues with this type of technology that can seriously impact the accuracy of scanning results. All too often, clients are blissfully unaware of these issues as they are not popular topics of conversation amongst vendors when trying to sell these tools.

Under certain corner-cases, the technology can produce a large number of false positives or false negatives for a client's source code. Clients can end up with a false sense of security or think the sky is falling. Both scenarios are bad. The impacts to an organisation can be unexpected and unpleasant.

First, this discussion briefly discusses what static code analysis entails. It also highlights the potential impacts of improper use of this technology on an organisation. Then, I present the technical (and often undetected) pitfalls that clients may experience that negatively impact the accuracy of scanner results. Then, this discussion highlights how clients can mitigate the risks associated with these issues through the use of policies, guidelines, and processes.

This discussion helps users of this technology get the best use of static analysis tools while mitigating the risks from particular scenarios. Furthermore, the discussion illustrates how security governance and detection technologies must be in sync to achieve an accurate understanding of your current security posture.

Luke Jahnke

Web: http://www.securusglobal.com/

Bio: Louis and Luke work as security consultants for Securus Global in Melbourne. Their research mainly focuses on web and database security issues. They both presented at Auscert, Ruxcon and Ruxmon in 2011.

Talk Abstract: Harder, Better, Faster, Stronger...

SQL Injection vulnerabilities are common and relatively well-known, however, most current discussion of SQL injection attacks focus on WAF bypass or gaining more access to the system (e.g. code execution). This talk focuses on how to be more efficient in retrieving the information stored within the database.

This talk contains three major components: Firstly: How to reduce the size of SQL injection attacks, for example, replacing "OR 1=1" with "||1" in MySQL, as well as how some functions can help reduce exploit size.

Secondly: How to retrieve more information with only a single request, for example, how to utilise information encoding, compression functions and previous knowledge (such as data-type and format) to retrieve more data.

Finally: How to retrieve more information using more states; blind SQL injection exploitation is based on boolean states, but in some situations, more states can be created.

Magno (Logan) Rodrigues

Web: https://www.owasp.org/index.php/User:Magno_Logan

Bio: Magno (Logan) Rodrigues is the OWASP Paraiba Chapter Leader and has spoken in many events like GTS, Co0L, ENSOL, ECD and AppSec Latam 2011. He is also organizing the OWASP Paraíba Day 2012 and the OWASP AppSec Brasil 2012. He is a grad student in Information Security (MBA) from FATEC - I2P. He studied Computer Forensics for one year in New York, US at TC3. Graduated in Internet Systems from the Federal Institute of Technology of Paraiba - IFPB (BS). He works as a System Analyst at Politec Global IT Services, doing services for State Department of Taxation and Finance of the State of Paraiba, in João Pessoa, PB, Brazil.

Talk Abstract: Security Testing on Web Applications - How to protect yourself and avoid getting owned

Web Applications are the number one threat for companies and organizations today. And that's why they need to be fully tested and validated before they go into production. In this presentation we'll show what are the highest risks for web applications and how to avoid them. The OWASP Top 10 and the CWE/SANS Top 25 will give us a broader view of the most common vulnerabilities in web applications. After that, we'll show how test and find these vulnerabilities in your own web applications following the OWASP Testing Guide, the OSSTMM and using free and open source tools provided by the community like Mantra, ZAP, etc. To finish we'd like to show developers some best practices on how to develop code by introducing them to the Developers Guide and the Securing Coding Practices as well as some other guides that would help them in developing better and safer applications.

Mark Goudie


Bio: Mark Goudie is the Verizon Business managing principal for Investigative Response in Asia-Pacific and brings more than 20 years experience in IT to this role. He specializes in computer forensics and incident response, and has held this role since 2007.

Goudie has held many roles in information technology and security including communication programmer, network manager, security architect, and security manager.

In 2005 and 2006, Goudie was a member of the SANS (SysAdmin, Audit, Network, Security) Institute expert panel that identifies the top 20 Internet security threats to business and organizations. He is a joint author of the Verizon Business Data Breach Investigations Report and is a regular speaker at industry conferences including AusCERT, OWASP, PCI DSS, Ruxcon, and the INTERPOL Information Security Conference.

Goudie has a bachelor of business degree, majoring in IT, from Victoria University of Technology, Melbourne, and an associate diploma in mechanical engineering from Regency Institute of TAFE based in Adelaide. He is a payment card industry qualified security assessor, and has global information assurance certification in hacker techniques, exploits and incident handling (GCIH), systems and network auditing (GSNA), and forensic analysis (GCFA).

Talk Abstract: Data Breaches - when application security goes wrong

2011 was another transformational year in computer security incidents with sensitive data being stolen by hactivists, insiders with legitimate access, self taught and untrained hackers, highly customised malware outbreaks and increases in corporate espionage. The victims of these data breaches in 2011 where a different demographic as now we are witnessing attacks against household brand names and infrastructure that we have not seen in the past. Like other historical events, we are doomed to repeat these mistakes if we do not learn from them.

The presentation will illustrate how sensitive data is stolen using metrics from over 1,000 cases of confirmed data breach. We will illustrate who is stealing the sensitive data, why they are doing it, and what can be done to protect against further data breach. By using data from real world investigations we are able to use an evidence based risk management approach. This enables our analysis to bring the critical problems to the surface and focus the attention on what truly matters to remediate the root causes of data breaches. Recommendations are presented in a very prescriptive and practical fashion so they are immediately implementable.

Matias Madou

Web: http://blog.fortify.com/blog

Bio: Matias Madou is Principal Security Researcher at the HP Fortify Security Research Group where he’s working on mainly technical projects, ranging from kicking off an insider threat project, to spearheading new protection mechanisms in the runtime tools. As he always wants to get the most out of solutions, he has a big hand in the correlation and integration of current HP Fortify security solutions.

When he’s away from his desk, he’s instructing advanced training courses or helping out the field at short notice or presenting at DefCon, RSA, BruCon, Owasp, ... He holds a Ph.D. in computer engineering from Ghent University, where he studied application security through program obfuscation to hide the inner workings of an application. During his Ph.D., he collaborated with top research and industry players in the field of program obfuscation.

Talk Abstract: Breaking is easy, preventing is hard

Is security a losing battle? Breaking software seems to become easier over time, while protecting it seems to become harder and harder. The situation in 2011 was bleak: from Anonymous using simple SQL injection attacks against big targets, to Stuxnet and Duqu, all the way to external intrusions in to the Playstation network and RSA. In this talk, we explain this phenomenon and explore methods the industry might use to reverse the trend.

The rules for the security game are simple: coders can’t make any mistakes, because attackers only have to discover one good vulnerability to win. Finding vulnerabilities in a target program becomes easier provided enough time, of which attackers have plenty. New kinds of vulnerabilities and novel techniques for finding old ones often leave defenders playing catch-up with the bad guys, but also provide an opportunity for defenders to capture and leverage ever increasing vulnerability knowledge in their vulnerability assessment efforts.

Let us illustrate this opportunity with an example-- the open source enterprise automation software Apache OfBiz. In 2010, a security research firm stumbled on a couple of vulnerabilities in the widely used project. As a proof of concept, the firm posted a video showing how easy it was to become an administrator by exploiting one of the XSS issues in the application. To remain credible, the OFBiz team reacted quickly and remediated the vulnerabilities. After that push, security improvements in the product stalled.

After the security push, a problem in Sun’s JVM was discovered that permitted attackers to perform a denial-of-service attack, (the so called “Parse Double” problem), against vulnerable installations. Around the same time, new gray-box analysis techniques were introduced to the market. We tested the post-security-push version of Apache Ofbiz for the parse double vulnerability (as well as other well-known vulnerability categories) using this new analysis technique. The conclusion? Only one year after the Apache Ofbiz development team undertook its major security push, the same code base thought to be secure was already vulnerable.

We kickoff the session by introducing Apache OFBiz and the security improvements implemented in its latest release. Next, we introduce the parse double denial of service vulnerability and a new assessment technique called gray-box analysis. Throughout the presentation, we dive into the internals of gray-box analysis and show how gray-box analysis can overcome some of the problems white-and black-box analyses face. Finally, we show a dozen new vulnerabilities in Apache OFBiz that have always been there, but were only identified using the latest security intelligence and assessment techniques.

Matt Tesauro

Web: http://appseclive.org

Bio: Matt has been involved in the Information Technology industry for more than 10 years. Prior to joining Rackspace, Matt was a security consultant for security firms such as Trustwave as well as running an internal application security effort for a large government agency. Matt's focus has been in application security including testing, code reviews, design reviews and training. His background in web application development and system administration helped bring a holistic focus to Secure SDLC efforts he's driven. He has taught both graduate level university courses and for large financial institutions. Matt has presented and provided training a various industry events including DHS Software Assurance Workshop, AppSec EU, AppSec US, AppSec Academia, and AppSec Brazil.

Matt is currently on the board of the OWASP Foundation in the role of Treasurer and highly involved in many OWASP projects and committees. Matt is the project leader of the OWASP WTE (Web Testing Environment) which is the source of the OWASP Live CD Project and Virtual Machines pre-configured with tools and documentation for testing web applications.

Industry designations include the Certified Information Systems Security Professional (CISSP) and Certified Ethical Hacker (CEH). Matt Tesauro has a B.S. in Economics and a M.S in Management Information Systems from Texas A&M University.

Talk Abstract: Testing from the Cloud: Is the Sky Falling?

More and more IT is being moved to the cloud, why shouldn't your testing move there too? This talk will cover what it takes to take your testing tools from your laptop to the cloud using new features of the OWASP Web Testing Environment (WTE). WTE allows you to create custom installations of application security tools in the cloud on demand. Has your IP been shunned? No problem, kill that cloud instance and startup another. Is your life as mobile as your phone? No problem, a laptop + Internet = access to all your favorite tools from anywhere. Multiple clients? No problem, start an an instance for each one. By the end of this talk, you'll know all you need to fire up an cloud instance with all of your favorite tools and start having fun.

Mike Park

Web: http://www.trustwave.com/

Bio: Mike Park is a Managing Consultant at Trustwave. He is a member of Trustwave's SpiderLabs - the advanced security team focused on penetration testing, incident response, and application security. He has over 12 years experience building and securing software for a variety of companies. Mike is a CISSP and specializes in application security assessment, penetration testing, reverse engineering and secure development life cycle. Mike is an active member of the Ottawa ISSA.

Talk Abstract: Mobile Security on iOS and Android - Where the bdies are buried

This will be a continuation and expansion of my talk on Android Security from AppsecUSA in September 2011. It will include new material on the mobile threat-scape, new material on iOS and additional examples from real life mobile penetration tests conducted by SpiderLabs Application Security Services.

We will start with a general review of the security landscape by Charles Henderson, with reference to our latest Global Security report and how it applies to the mobile application space. This will include who is doing the attacking and why. We will touch on the target rich environment in mobile applications as well the types of applications targeted

We will then move on to concrete examples of how and why mobile applications and platforms are susceptible to the kind hacking and attacking just presented.

Stating with an overview of iOS, we'll discuss the iPhone\iPad platform and they ways it is attacked, why data is leaked and how developers can defend against it.

We'll then continue into explaining how Android is different - not better or worse, but merely different. Again, we'll touch on how Android is attacked, how data is leaked and how developers can defend on this platform.

We'll then wrap up the talk by speculating about the future of mobile security and mobile application penetration testing.

Throughout the presentation, we'll use real-world (though, obviously, sanitized) examples from real penetration tests we have conducted over the past few years at Spider labs. Where appropriate, we'll demonstrate some of our points with live or recorded demos of the issues and techniques discussed.

As usual, we expect there to be a lively discussion and tough questions following the talk.

Peter Freiberg

Web: http://shelde.com

Bio: Peter is a Principal Consultant at Shelde and heads up the Application Security Practice. Here he assists customers build application security and risk management capabilities including secure design and development, testing and ethical hacking, training and education.

Prior to Shelde, Peter was a Director at Deloitte, providing application security and risk consulting services to leading companies in Australia. He also ran the Application Security Practice for Deloitte, driving the capability, direction and quality of the service. He also spent seven years at VeriSign (now Symantec) as a Solutions Architect providing specialised security services in integrating products such as PKI, OTP, Credit Card gateways and software development for key internal systems. He was the key technical architect for developing and maintaining a Government endorsed PKI security identity platform (Gatekeeper).

He has over 14 years experience in the IT industry with 11 spent in Security and is a Certified Secure Software Lifecycle Professional (CSSLP).

Talk Abstract: Application Security Logging and Monitoring - The Next Frontier

Many applications have poor security logs and consequently have limited ability to detect attacks and respond.

However, it’s not that surprising given the lack of security logging frameworks available. Even more mature frameworks in Java and .Net don’t actually provide much guidance on what to log, and there’s even less guidance on how to correlate and alert on events. Most logging frameworks on focused only on exceptions, with limited support (if any) on security events.

Application Security Logging faces four key issues:

  • Lack of Security Logging Frameworks
  • Lack of requirements for security logging
  • Lack of correlation and alerting capabilities
  • Lack of guidance on what and how to log

While we’re still battling with the basics of developer security education and embedding secure practices, security professionals also need to think longer term about how to monitor user behavior, detect security events and build in proper logging and response capabilities.

Often security has focused on how to build secure applications but most enterprises also need behavioral information and detail event data to investigate incidents and identify malicious activity.

This talk will discuss:

  • The challenges for application security logging and monitoring
  • Common issues in current logging practices
  • Current resources (or lack of) available to developers for security logging
  • Tools for correlating and alerting from log sources
  • Logging in multi-tiered architectures and disparate systems
  • Which logging capabilities can be driven by application security and what types of logging might be required by audit and the business



Prashant Verma


Bio: Prashant Verma is a Senior Security Consultant and Competency Lead at Paladion Networks. He drives the Mobile Application Security Service and Research at Paladion. He is the co-author of the "Security Testing Handbook for Banking Applications". He has also authored security articles for the Hacki9 and Palisade magazines. He has given presentations at Club Hack 2011 on "Pentesting Mobile Applications". He has also given guest lectures and security trainings at various occasions, which include the National Institute of Bank Management (NIBM) and Babasaheb Ambedkar Marathwada University (BAMU). He is a "Digital Evidence Analyst" i.e. he has conducted Mobile Security Testing, Java, Android and iOS Security Code Reviews. He has also conducted numerous application and network penetration tests, vulnerability assessments, etc.

Talk Abstract: Advanced Mobile Application Code Review Techniques

Learn how Mobile experts blend their techniques in order to accelerate code reviews. While reviewing Android or iOS applications, you will love these handy tricks that help in detecting famous and a few not-so-famous flaws. Using demonstrations and code snippets, we will highlight the benefits of blended techniques in comparison with those of simple scanning or manual testing. You will also learn how to reduce the time taken for review and obtain a ready-to-use checklist.




Pravir Chandra


Bio: Pravir Chandra is a veteran in the security space and a long-time OWASP contributor, including his role as the creator and leader of the Open Software Assurance Maturity Model (OpenSAMM) project. Currently as security architect for the CTO of Bloomberg, he drives proactive security initiatives that demonstrate concrete value for the firm. Prior to this, Pravir was Director of Strategic Services at HP/Fortify where he lead software security assurance programs for Fortune 500 clients in a variety of verticals. He is responsible for standing up the most comprehensive and measurably effective programs in existence today. As a thought leader in the security field for over 10 years, Pravir has written many articles, whitepapers, and books and is routinely invited to speak at businesses and conferences world-wide.

Talk Abstract: Modern software security assurance with OpenSAMM

For those that haven't seen it already, the Open Software Assurance Maturity Model (OpenSAMM) is a flexible and prescriptive framework for building security into software development (http://opensamm.org). It has been in use by a huge number of organizations since its release in 2009, but what have we learned through seeing where it worked really well and where it could use improvement? This talk will explore the basic framework of the model, how it helps people build assurance programs, and then go far beyond to discuss actual examples of rubber-on-the-road usage of the model within companies. This will also segue into details on the next revision of OpenSAMM due out later this year. OpenSAMM is an open and free project under the Open Web Application Security Project (OWASP).

Rafal Los


Bio: Rafal Los, Chief Security Evangelist for Hewlett-Packard Software, combines over a decade of subject-matter expertise in information security and risk management with a critical business perspective. From technical research to building and implementing enterprise application security programs, Rafal has a track record with organizations of diverse sizes and verticals. He is a featured speaker at events around the globe, and has presented at events produced by OWASP, ISSA, Black Hat, and SANS among many others. He stays active in the community by writing, speaking and contributing research, representing HP in OWASP, the Cloud Security Alliance and other industry groups. His blog, Following the White Rabbit, with his unique perspective on security and risk management has amassed a following from his industry peers, business professionals, and even the media and can be found at http://hp.com/go/white-rabbit.

Prior to joining HP, Los defined what became the software security program and served as a regional security lead at a Global Fortune 100 contributing to the global organization's security and risk-management strategy internally and externally. Rafal prides himself on being able to add a 'tint of corporate realism' to information security.

Rafal received his B. S. in Computer Information Systems from Concordia University, River Forest, Ill.

Talk Abstract: Overcoming the Quality vs Quantity Problem in Software Security Testing
The current state of software security poses a very serious problem when it comes to technology. Does the organization strive for more quality, or quantity in uncovering critical software security defects? Unfortunately as a result of the constraints of many security organizations' budgets and available resources these critical components are often mutually exclusive. Organizations shouldn't have to sacrifice quality for quantity, or vice versa their software security programs. While obtaining good quantity of coverage (both inside a single application from a static and dynamic perspective and across the enterprise application landscape) is critical to understanding the total threat profile of an organization, the organization simply can't forego the quality aspect because a poor test can not only provide a false statement of compliance but create the illusion of security. So what can organizations constrained by resources, capital and knowledge do to balance quantity against quality in their software security programs? How can people, process, and technologies be leveraged to effectively balance the quantity vs. quality scale? The speaker will address this very critical balance from a vendor-neutral, technology-agnostic perspective, giving developers, quality analysts and security testers the perspective necessary to provide optimal balance.

Simon Bennetts

Web: http://www.owasp.org/index.php/OWASP_Zed_Attack_Proxy_Project http://www.owasp.org/index.php/OWASP_Zed_Attack_Proxy_Project]

Twitter:@psiinon
Bio: Simon Bennetts started the OWASP Zed Attack Proxy project, and leads the international group of volunteers who develop it. He is also one of the founders of the OWASP Manchester chapter and the OWASP Data Exchange Format project. In his day job he works for Sage UK Ltd as a Team Leader for both a development and a security team. His day to day work includes designing and building web applications, performing security assessments and delivering security training.

Talk Abstract: OWASP Zed Attack Proxy (ZAP)

The OWASP Zed Attack Proxy (ZAP) is an easy to use integrated penetration testing tool for finding vulnerabilities in web applications. It has been identified by the OWASP Global Projects Committee as a flagship OWASP project.

ZAP is designed to be used by people with a wide range of security experience and as such is ideal for developers and functional testers who are new to penetration testing as well as experienced pentesters. It has comprehensive help pages, is fully internationalized and has been translated into 11 languages.

A fork of the well regarded Paros Proxy, it was first released in September 2010 and the last version (1.3.4) has been downloaded over 13,000 times.

This talk will:

  • Explain why ZAP was released.
  • Show what it can do.
  • Detail the new features included in ZAP 1.4, which is planned to be released before this conference.
  • Describe how you can easily build extensions to ZAP which have full access to all of its functionality.



Srikar Sagi

Web: http://www.linkedin.com/in/srikarsagi

Bio: Passionate about building Secure & Reliable Systems at the lowest cost possible for organizations with 16+years of valuable industry experience and knowledge in Information Security & Risk Management, Infrastructure/ Application & Data Security, Threat Modeling, Writing Security Standards, Designing & Building Enterprise Security Architecture, Execution of Strategies & Programs to Mitigate Information Risks, Developing Secure Applications, Writing Standards for Cryptographic Usage & PKI/Cryptography Architectural Solutions, Reviewing Security Architecture, Security Risk Analysis & Mitigation, Verification of Security Compliance for Data Privacy, Implementing Compliance Programs

Talk Abstract: Password Less Authentication, Authorization and Payments

A Mobile is ‘ONE'S OWN’ Identity in 21st Century Authentication & Authorization, is done via two independent networks : The IP network , The mobile network. A hacker who gets any sensitive user account information from the browser, cannot access the user's account unless he gets hold on their mobile phone & Users do not have to remember lengthy or complicated passwords, keep changing them frequently, no more tokens, just your identity i.e. your Mobile phone.


To Minimize A/c. takeovers, Authentication & Authorization in the presence of malware mess & Replace OTPs & Broken 2 Factor Auth by using personal device- "Cell Phone & TeleCom Network" to prove Identity on the Net using Public Key Encryption & Digital Signatures to improve security, reduce costs & relieve users pain to remember many passwords, no more tokens.

Tobias Gondrom

Web: http://datatracker.ietf.org/wg/websec/charter/

Bio: Tobias Gondrom is Managing Director of an IT Security & Risk Management Advisory based in the United Kingdom and Germany. He has twelve years of experience in software development, application security, cryptography, electronic signatures and global standardisation organisations working for independent software vendors and large global corporations in the financial, technology and government sector, in America, EMEA and APAC. As the Global Head of the Security Team at Open Text (2005-2007) and from 2000-2004 as the lead of the Security Task Force at IXOS Software AG, he was responsible for security, risk and incident management and introduced and implemented a secure SDLC used globally by development departments in the US, Canada, UK and Germany.

Since 2003 he is the chair of working groups of the IETF (www.ietf.org) in the security area, member of the IETF security directorate, and since 2010 chair of the formed web security WG at the IETF, and a former chapter lead of the German OWASP chapter from 2007 to 2008 and board member of OWASP London. Tobias is the author of the international standards RFC 4998, RFC 6283 and co-author and contributor to a number of internet standards and papers on security and electronic signatures, as well as the co-author of the book „Secure Electronic Archiving“, and frequent presenter at conferences and publication of articles (e.g. AppSec, ISSE, Moderner Staat, IETF, VOI-booklet “Electronic Signature“, iX).

Talk Abstract: Securing the SSL channel against man-in-the-middle attacks: Future technologies - HTTP Strict Transport Security and Pinning of Certs

Securing the SSL channel against man-in-the-middle attacks: Future technologies - HTTP Strict Transport Security and and Pinning of Certs (defending against CA private key compromises - learnings from the DigiNotar breach)

In the recent months major trusted CAs providing trusted certificates for SSL/TLS in browser scenarios were compromised (e.g. seen in the Diginotar breach) and based on the current trust models (trusting all registered CAs equally for all domains) exposed vital web applications to the risk of man-in-the-middle attacks. Several approaches are currently discussed to mitigate this risk. The most advanced and closest to final adoption being the technologies discussed by the browser vendors at the recent IETF meeting in November in Taipei: HSTS and pinning of certificates. To better protect content providers against the distribution of bogus certificates, an HTTP header extension containing a fingerprint of their certificates linked to a domain address has been defined. This approach, which has been partly tested in Chrome, and already helped identify and protect to some extend Google's web application in the recent Diginotar compromise. Chrome users were able to detect the bogus DigiNotar certificates because Chrome had embedded the hashes of valid Google certificates. Back in July, the hacked DigiNotar certificate authority (CA), which has since gone out of business, was used to issue more than five hundred bogus certificates for companies including Google and various intelligence services.

The presented technology is cutting edge and although the specification is not final yet, it will be rolled-out in about 6 months time. Two other models that compete or complement this approach will also be discussed (DNSSEC and Moxie's Convergence).


Wayne O'Yong

Web: http://www.imperva.com

Bio: Wayne O’Young is a Senior Security Engineer for Imperva Inc, pioneer and leader of a new category of data security solutions. Based out of Sydney, Wayne has over a decade of experience in the IT and telecommunications industry having started his career as developing business applications. Moreover he has spent most of his career focusing on information security.

His professional interests include information systems security, in particular in the virtualized environment, mobility and sustainability of IT. Before joining Imperva, Wayne has held similar positions at Check Point Software Technologies and Juniper Network. Wayne holds an honours degree in Engineering and Computer Science from University of Sydney.

Talk Abstract: De-Anonymizing Anonymous

What do you see when you take the Guy Fawkes mask off? In 2011, Imperva managed to witness an assault by hacktivist group Anonymous including the use of social media for communications and, most importantly, their attack methods. Since Anonymous’ targets are highly variable, anyone can fall victim and security professionals need to know how to prepare. This talk will give a walk-through the key stages of an Anonymous campaign: - Recruitment and communication: We show how Anonymous leverages social networks to recruit its members and pick a target. - Application attack: We detail and sequence the steps Anonymous hackers deploy to take data and bring down websites. - DDoS: In this final stage, we shed light on the DDoS techniques deployed to take down websites. Finally, we recommend key mitigation steps that organizations need to take if they ever become a target.


The Conference Committee is excited to announce that the conference has been openly supported by the following vendors and associations. Without the great support of these companies and organisations the 2012 event would not be what it is today.

Diamond & Platinum Sponsors

The OWASP Conference 2012, welcomes our sponsors for Diamond and Platinum. There are still spaces available for sponsorship, but it's closing fast.

More information is available on our sponsorship packages by viewing the sponsor pack File:AppSec AsiaPac 2012 Sponsorship.pdf. Contact our Committee for more information.

Fortify HP logo.png


Gold & Silver Sponsors

The OWASP Conference 2012, welcomes our sponsors for Gold and Silver. The conference still has availability for other Gold and Silver sponsors.

AppsecureTransLogo.png Imperva 312x54.jpg Ionize75H.jpg CS-LogoWeb.png Trustwave small.png


Associations & Supporters

We are proudly supported by the following Industry Associations and Media outlets.

Auscert-Header-logo.gif AisaLogo.png


As part of AppSec APAC 2012, on Thursday, April 12 at 1:30PM-5:00PM, the Global Chapter Committee is organizing a chapter leader workshop for all the chapter leaders that attend the conference. Please note that this Workshop will take place on the day before the Conference starts.


Agenda

We plan to start with a 1.5 hour session run by experienced leaders (panel) on how to run a successful chapter. The second part of the workshop will be a roundtable discussion on regional issues and challenges, with a goal of working together to create solutions.


Are there other topics you would like to discuss? Please add them below:

  • Best practices of Chapter organization
  • How long should a leader lead a chapter?
  • ...

Funding to Attend Workshop

If you need financial assistance to attend the Chapter Leader Workshop at AppSec APAC, please submit a request to Josh Sokol and Sarah Baso by March 1, 2012.


Funding for your attendance to the workshop should be worked out in the following order.

  1. Ask your employer to fund your trip to AppSec Asia Pacific in Sydney, Australia.
  2. Utilize your chapter funds.
  3. Ask the chapter committee for funding assistance.


While we wish we could fund every chapter leader, due to the limited amount of budget allocated for this event, we may not be able to fund 100% to all the requests. Priority of sponsorships will be given to those not covered by a sponsorship to attend a workshop in 2011. Additionally, we are looking for new or struggling chapter leaders who need assistance kick starting their chapter.

After March 1, the Global Chapters Committee will make funding decision in a fair and transparent manner. When you apply for funding, please let us know why we should sponsor you. While we prefer that chapter leaders use their own chapter's funds before requesting a sponsorship, this is not a requirement for application. If your chapter has fund but will not be using them to sponsor your attendance, please include why you will not be using the funds for this purpose (i.e. what are the other plans for those funds?).


Participants

If you plan to attend, please fill in your name and chapter below:

  • Sarah Baso (OWASP Operational Support)
  • Andrew van der Stock
  • Mohd Fazli Azran (GCC & Malaysia Chapter)
  • Benny Ketelslegers (OWASP Japan)
  • Serg Belokamen
  • Simon Bennetts (UK)
  • Jonathan Carter
  • Justin Clarke (London)
  • Frank Fan (China)
  • Christian Frichot (Perth)
  • Kitisak Jirawannakool (Thailand)
  • Nahil Mahmood (Pakistan)
  • Thanh Nguyen (Vietnam)
  • Chris Gatford (Sydney)
  • Wouter Veugelen (Sydney)
  • Gandhi Aryavalli (India)

...

Remote Participation

Details TBA.

2011 Chapter Leader Workshops


Questions?

Contact us:
Josh Sokol, Chapters Committee Chair
Sarah Baso, OWASP Operational Support - Conference Logistics & Community Relations

We're excited to announce that the location of the OWASP Conference for Appsec Asia 2012 will be held at:

Four Points Sheraton, Darling Harbour
161 Sussex Street
Sydney, New South Wales 2000
Australia

The facility provides hotel rooms and conference facilities, OWASP has secured cheap room rates directly in the hotel for the duration of the event.

If you don't know your way around Sydney, here's the Google Maps link to the Hotel.

http://maps.google.com.au/maps/place?q=Four+Points+by+Sheraton+Sydney,+Sussex+Street,+Sydney,+New+South+Wales&hl=en&cid=7369128618339939693

FourPointsSheratonDarlingHarbour.jpg

We are using both the Ground and upper levels. The majority of the event will be held on the ground level, including all breaks etc. Attendees will find the registration and conference desk located at the Ground level near Hotel Reception. (You're not going to get lost, as we take up most of the ground level for this event.)

Further details about venue locations will be posted when they become available.

For assistance with any of the items below, feel free to utilize OWASP's preferred travel agency:
Segale Travel Service contact information is: +1-800-841-2276
Sr. Travel Consultants:
Maria Martinez...ext 524
Linn Vander Molen...ext 520


Additionally, the Conference Planning Team is available to answer any questions!


Accommodation

We've been able to arrange for accommodation within the Four Points Sheraton Hotel(where the training and conference will be held) for attendees. These rooms have been allocated at a special rate, and available strictly for a limited time. To book these rooms at the special rate, you need to use the booking link shown below. These rooms are available one night either side of the event ensuring that if you are travelling interstate or international it's easy to find a room at a good rate. The room rate allocated for the event is $200 AUD Inclusive per night.


Four Points Sheraton, Darling Harbour
161 Sussex Street
Sydney, New South Wales 2000
Australia

http://www.starwoodmeeting.com/Book/OWASP


Travel Domestic

The OWASP Conference is to be held in Sydney at the Darling Harbour precinct. Hotel Location, http://maps.google.com.au/maps/place?q=Four+Points+by+Sheraton+Sydney,+Sussex+Street,+Sydney,+New+South+Wales&hl=en&cid=7369128618339939693


International Travel

The Sydney International Airport is located adjacent to the Domestic terminal. Similar taxi fares to the city and hotel venue apply. If you are travelling by train, you can ride the train from the International terminal all the way to the Town Hall station as above.


Airport Transportation

  • Any major Airline carrier will fly you into Sydney Airport, from here, you can take a Taxi (Approx $35-40 AUD).
  • KST Sydney Airport Shuttle -- $18AUD oneway/ $32AUD roundtrip
  • Another option is the train from the Airport, which you can ride all the way into the closest station which is Town Hall. From this stop the hotel is a small downhill walk (no more then 5-10mins) from the station.


Driving Instructions

From Sydney Airport (South)

Travel along Southern Cross Drive and take the South Dowling Street exit.

Turn right onto Dacey Avenue.

At the second set of traffic lights turn left onto Anzac Parade.

Follow Anzac Parade past Moore Park on your right; Anzac Parade will become Flinders Street.

Turn left onto Oxford Street and follow to Liverpool Street; Hyde Park will be on your right.

Continue along Liverpool Street and turn right onto Kent Street.

Travel five blocks and turn left onto Erskine Street.

Immediately turn left again onto Sussex Street. The hotel will be on your right.


From East

Proceed along New South Head Road. Continue onto William Street and then onto Park Street; Hyde Park will be on your right.

Proceed along Park Street as it becomes Druitt Street and turn right onto Kent Street.

Travel approximately three blocks and turn left onto Erskine Street.

Immediately turn left again onto Sussex Street. The hotel will be on your right.


From West

Proceed along the Western Distributor towards the city taking the City North exit followed by the Sussex Street South Exit.

Turn right onto Sussex Street, the hotel will be on your right.


From North

Take the Pacific Highway/Warringah Highway and proceed over the Sydney Harbour Bridge.

Take the York street exit off the bridge and continue along before turning right into Erskine Street .

Proceed approximately three blocks before turning left into Sussex Street. The hotel will be on your right.


Justin Derry - Planning Committee Co-Chair
Andrew van der Stock - Planning Committee Co-Chair
Christian Frichot - Planning Committee Member
Andrew Mueller - Planning Committee Member
Mohd Fazli Azran - Global Conference Committee Liaison
Sarah Baso - OWASP Operational Support


If you are interested in helping out with this conference or have any questions, please contact us at: appsecasia2012@owasp.org